The 2015-16 Utah college basketball honors: A look at what players had the best year from the Utah, BYU and the other D1 schools

Posted: March 30, 2016 in basketball, BYU, BYU basketball, BYU Cougars, college basketball, NCAA, NCAA sports, rankings, sports, Uncategorized, Utah basketball, Utah State, Weber State
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It’s been a great year for college basketball in the state of Utah. The University of Utah and Weber State made it to the NCAA Tournament while BYU made it to New York for the Final Four of the NIT.

It was also a great year individually as Jakob Poeltl, Kyle Collinsworth and Joel Bolomboy won their respective conference’s Player of the Year award. There was also plenty of other conference recognition for players from BYU, Utah, Utah State, UVU and Weber State.

That gives us quite a list of talented players to choose from as we pick our All-Utah teams as well as the player of the year, defensive player of the year, sixth man of the year and freshman of the year.

Honorable mention

Kyle Davis, junior, forward, BYU

11.9 points, 7.5 rebounds, 1.3 blocks and 1.2 assists in 37 games.

James McGee, junior, guard, Southern Utah

12.2 points, 1.9 rebounds, 1.7 assists and 1.0 steals in 29 games.

Trey Kennedy, junior, guard, Southern Utah

11.4 points, 2.7 rebounds, 2.5 assists and 1.0 steals in 26 games.

Travon Langston, senior, guard, Southern Utah

11.2 points, 5.1 rebounds, 1.9 assists and 1.0 steals in 28 games.

Shane Rector, senior, guard, Utah State

9.3 points, 3.3 assists, 2.5 rebounds and 1.2 steals in 31 games.

Third-Team

Jaden Jackson, senior, guard, Utah Valley

Jackson closed out his Utah Valley career in style under first-year coach Mark Pope. He led the Wolverines in scoring while improving his shooting numbers across the board from his junior campaign. One of his best games of the year came in a win over Texas-Rio Grande Valley when he had 31 points on 11 of 16 shooting from the floor, including 9 for 12 from 3-point range in 35 minutes.

On the season, he averaged 14.4 points on 41.5 percent shooting with 2.5 rebounds and 2.5 assists in 33.5 minutes.

Lorenzo Bonam, junior, guard, Utah

Bonam had the tough task of trying to fill the hole left by the departure to the NBA of All-American Delon Wright, and did so admirably. He was at his best when he was putting the ball on the floor and attacking the basket to finish at the rim. One of his best games of the year came in a huge non-conference win over Texas Tech when he had a season-high 20 points on 50 percent shooting from the floor and 8 for 10 shooting from the free-throw line. He added seven rebounds, four assists and a steal in 33 minutes.

On the season, he averaged 10.2 points on 51.3 percent shooting with 3.3 rebounds, 3.0 assists and 1.0 steals in 26.6 minutes.

Kyle Kuzma, sophomore, forward, Utah

Kuzma took a huge step forward during his sophomore campaign for the Utes. He improved in just about every statistical category and was a big reason why Utah had such a successful season. One of his best outings of the year came in a win over Southern Utah when he had a season-high 23 points on 10 for 12 shooting from the floor. He added 12 rebounds, including five on the offensive end in 25 minutes.

On the season, he averaged 10.8 points on 52.2 percent shooting with 5.7 rebounds and 1.4 assists in 24.1 minutes.

Jordan Loveridge, senior, forward, Utah

Loveridge earned honorable mention All-Pac-12 after he averaged double figures in scoring for his fourth straight year. He was at his best when he was stretching the floor with his 3-point marksmanship so that Jakob Poeltl could dominate on the block. One of his best showings of the season came in an early season win over Southern Utah when he had a season high 24 points on 8 for 13 shooting from the floor, including 2 for 2 from beyond the arc. He added four rebounds and two assists in 33 minutes.

On the season, he averaged 11.6 points on 39.2 percent shooting with 3.8 rebounds and 1.7 assists in 30.8 minutes.

Konner Frey, junior, forward, Utah Valley

Frey had a big statistical season during his first season on the floor for the Wolverines after he transferred from Utah State. He was named to the WAC All-Newcomer team after he led UVU in rebounding and finished third in scoring. One of his best games came in a loss to Montana State when he put up 26 points on 50 percent shooting from the floor and 8 for 11 from the free-throw line. He added nine rebounds, two assists and a steal in 31 minutes.

On the season, he averaged 14.1 points on 42.2 percent shooting with 7.1 rebounds and 1.2 assists in 27.5 minutes.

Second-Team

Brandon Taylor, senior, guard, Utah

While Taylor had his worst shooting year both overall and from the 3-point line since coming to Utah, he still earned honorable mention All-Pac-12 and All-Defensive team for his contributions on the floor for the Utes during his senior year. One of his best showings of the year came in a huge win over Arizona when he had 19 points on 7 for 9 shooting from the field, including 4 for 5 from beyond the arc. He added five steals, three  rebounds and an assist in 38 minutes.

On the season, he averaged 9.7 points on 39.5 percent shooting with a team-leading 3.9 assists, 2.3 rebounds and 1.7 steals in 32.9 minutes.

Nick Emery, freshman, guard, BYU

Emery came out firing from day one and didn’t stop until the Cougars were eliminated in the Final Four of the NIT. He was Second-Team All-WCC after he finished second on team in scoring and had one of the best freshman campaigns in in BYU history. One of his best games of the year came in a big road win over San Francisco when he had 37 points on 12 for 15 shooting from the floor, including an incredible 10 of 12 from 3-point land and 3 for 3 from the free-throw line. He added five assists and two rebounds in 33 minutes.

On the season, he averaged 16.3 points on 42.5 percent shooting with 3.5 rebounds, 2.5 assists and 1.4 steals in 31.4 minutes.

Marcel Davis, senior, guard, Utah Valley

Davis became one of the best guards in the Western Athletic Conference during his senior year at UVU. He was a Second-Team All-WAC performer after leading the Wolverines in assists and finishing second on the team in scoring and rebounding. One of his best games came in a loss to Southern Utah when he registered 28 points on 11 for 15 shooting from the floor, including 4 for 6 from distance. He added seven rebounds, two assists and a steal in 36 minutes.

On the season, he averaged 14.3 points on 44.2 percent shooting with 5.6 rebounds, 5.1 assists and 1.1 steals in 33.4 minutes.

Chris Smith, senior, guard, Utah State

Smith had another impressive season in Logan as a senior. He was a Third-Team All-MWC performer after he finished second on the team in scoring and third on the team in rebounding. One of his best games came in a huge road win over Colorado State when he had 35 points on 10 for 17 shooting from the floor, including 4 for 7 from beyond the arc and 11 for 12 from the free-throw line. He added 13 rebounds, an assist and a steal in 38 minutes.

On the season, he averaged 15 points on 49.4 percent shooting with 5.3 rebounds and 2.1 assists in 31 minutes.

Jaylen Moore, junior, forward, Utah State

Even though the Aggies didn’t have a great season, Jalen Moore had a very productive campaign. He was named All-MWC Third-Team after he led Utah State in scoring and rebounding for the second straight season. One of his most impressive outings came in a win over Air Force when he finished with 23 points on 8 for 13 shooting from the floor, including 4 for 8 from beyond the arc. He added five rebounds, an assist and a block in 39 minutes.

On the season, he averaged 15.2 points on 43.9 percent shooting with 6.0 rebounds and 2.6 assists in 35.2 minutes.

First-Team

Kyle Collinsworth, senior, guard, BYU

Collinsworth had a record-breaking senior season on his way to winning the West Coast Conference Player of the Year award. He broke the school record for assists and rebounds while totaling five more triple-doubles. One of his best games came in a win over Belmont when he finished with 26 points on 9 for 19 shooting from the floor and 8 for 10 from the free-throw line. He added 10 rebounds, 10 assists and two steals in 35 minutes.

On the season, he averaged 15.3 points on 46.4 percent shooting with 8.2 rebounds, 7.4 assists and 2.0 steals in 37 games.

Chase Fischer, senior, guard, BYU

Fischer ended his BYU career as one of the most prolific outside shooters in school history. He made more than 100 3-point shots for the second straight season on his way to earning First-Team All-WCC honors. One of his best outings of the year came in a win over New Mexico when he went off for 41 points on 12 for 21 shooting from the floor, including 9 for 14 from beyond the arc and 8 for 9 from the free-throw line. He added five rebounds and four assists in 37 minutes.

On the season, he averaged a team-leading 18.2 points on 41.1 percent shooting with 2.8 rebounds, 2.1 assists and 1.1 steals in 34 minutes a night.

Jeremy Senglin, junior, guard, Weber State

Senglin had a tremendous junior season, helping to lead the Wildcats to the Big Sky regular season and conference tournament championships. He was named First-Team All-Big Sky after led the team in scoring and set a new single season school record with 106 3-pointers. One of his best showings came in a win over Drake when he finished with 34 points on 12 for 18 shooting from the floor, including 8 for 12 from beyond the arc. He added six rebounds and an assist in 36 minutes.

On the season, he averaged 17.9 points on 48.7 percent shooting from the floor, including 43.3 percent from beyond the arc. He added 3.6 rebounds and 2.8 assists in 35 minutes a contest.

Joel Bolomboy, senior, forward/center, Weber State

Bolomboy had the best season of any Wildcat since Damian Lillard left for the NBA. He was the first player in conference history to earn Big Sky Player of the Year and Defensive Player of the Year in the same season. Along the way, he broke the school and conference record for all-time rebounds as well as setting the Weber State single-season record for rebounds and double-double, according to Weberstatesports.com. One of his best games came in a loss to Utah Valley when he had 28 points on 7 for 16 shooting from the floor  and 13 for 16 shooting from the free-throw line. He added 20 rebounds and two steals in 45 minutes.

On the season, he averaged 17.1 points on 57.3 percent shooting to go along with 12.6 rebounds, 1.2 blocks and 1.1 assists in 31.6 minutes a game.

Jakob Poeltl, sophomore, center, Utah

Poeltl had as good a season as any Utah player has had in the last decade. He won the Pac-12 Player of the Year after leading the Utes to a second place finish in the conference and a trip to the NCAA Tournament. He was the team’s leading scorer (by a large margin), even though he only attempted 9.8 shots per contest, as well as the leading rebounder and shot blocker. One of his best games of the year came in a big win over Temple when he had 32 points on 10 of 12 shooting from the floor and 12 of 14 from free-throw line. He added 11 rebounds, three blocks and two steals in 36 minutes.

On the season, he averaged 17.2 points on 64.6 percent shooting with 9.1 rebounds, 1.9 assists and 1.6 blocks in 30.4 minutes.

Sixth Man of the Year

Kyndahl Hill, junior, forward, Weber State

Although a handful of other players did a nice job coming off the bench, Hill was the clear choice here. After two seasons as a solid contributor for the Wildcats, he took a step forward as a junior. He was named the Top Reserve in the Big Sky conference after finishing third in the league in field goal percentage as well as seventh in blocked shots and 11th in rebounding. One of his most impressive games of the season came in a win over South Dakota State when he totaled 21 points on 7 for 7 shooting from the floor and 7 for 8 from the foul line. He added six rebounds, two assists, two blocks and a steal in 28 minutes.

On the season, he averaged 8.2 points on 61.6 percent shooting from the floor with 5.9 rebounds and 1.0 blocks in 23.2 minutes a night.

Freshman of the Year

Nick Emery, guard, BYU

While Weber State’s McKay Cannon, and Zach Braxton as well as BYU’s Zach Seljaas, Utah Valley’s Hayden Schenck and Utah State’s Quinn Taylor all had solid freshman campaigns, this award was a no-brainer. Emery was one of the go-to offensive weapons all season long as the Cougars won 26 games. He showed his ability to get to the rim and finish in traffic on a consistent basis while also knocking down nearly 100 3-pointers.

Defensive Player of the Year

Joel Bolomboy, Weber State

While Brandon Taylor did a nice job as an on-ball defender, Bolomboy was another easy choice. He was a beast on the glass and an intimidator in the paint. He was one of the best rebounders in the country, averaging 12.6 boards. He also swatted away 1.2 shots a contest in leading the Wildcats to a Big Sky regular season and tournament championships and a trip to the big dance.

Player of the Year

Jakob Poeltl, Utah

The choice for the player of the year was the toughest one to make with Collinsworth and Bolomboy each also making a strong case after terrific seasons. In the end, it was the dominating play of Poeltl that won out. He was far and away the best player for the Utes during a run to the second round of the NCAA Tournament. Not only did he earn conference player of the year honors, but he was also named a First-Team All-American by numerous outlets.

 

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