From Rick Adelman to Keon Clark to Sam Worthen, 269 players have suited up for the Jazz since the organization began back in 1974, according to Basketball-reference.com. Some have been legends while others were so forgettable that even the most die-hard of fans won’t remember their names.

This list is the best-of-the-best of those players. The hall of famers, the all-stars, the knockdown shooters, the great rebounders, the fantastic rim protectors and the guys who have helped make the Jazz deep playoff runs.

Since the Jazz have had plenty of great players, there isn’t room for everyone who made a huge impact to make the team. Notable omissions include hall of famers Walt Bellamy, Bernard King, Spencer Haywood and Gail Goodrich as well as all-stars John Drew and Truck Robinson.

Here is my Utah Jazz all-time team. 

Note: Only what each player did with the Jazz was taken into account when building the team.

Bench

Gordon Hayward (2010-current)

Hayward narrowly edged out Jeff Malone for the last bench spot based on his versatility. While Malone was an excellent scorer, Hayward can do it all. He has stepped up his game each year and is coming into the prime of his career as the Jazz are looking to get back into the thick of things in the West. While he is still early in his career, he is already 10th in franchise history in assists, 12th in steals and 14th in scoring.

For his career, he is averaging 14.6 points, 4.0 rebounds, 3.4 assists and 1.0 steals in 443 games.

Thurl Bailey (1983-91, ’98-99)

Bailey was an impact player as a starter, but was at his best coming off the bench during his time with the Jazz. He was a high level scorer who could help out on the glass and protect the rim. He is fifth in Jazz history in points and blocks while landing at sixth on the rebounds list.

For his Jazz career, he averaged 14 points, 5.5 rebounds, 1.6 assists and 1.2 blocks in 708 games.

Paul Millsap (2006-13)

While he has gone on to be a three-time all-star since leaving the Jazz, Millsap still did enough during his time in Utah to make this team. Where he did most of his damage with the Jazz was on the glass where he is fourth in franchise history in offensive rebounds and eighth in total rebounds. He also provided some offensive fire power, ranking 13th all-time in scoring.

For his Jazz career, he averaged 12.4 points on 51.6 percent shooting with 7.0 rebounds, 1.8 assists, 1.1 steals and 1.0 blocks in 540 games.

Rickey Green (1980-88)

Green revived his career with the Jazz and turned out to be one of the best lead guards the organization has ever had. While he was a solid scorer, he was at his best sharing the ball or playing tough defense. He is third in franchise history in both steals and assists and 10th all-time in scoring.

For his Jazz career, he averaged 11.4 points, 6.9 assists, 2.3 rebounds and 1.8 steals in 606 games.

Mehmet Okur (2004-11)

Okur is the best outside shooting big man the Jazz have ever had. He had range well past the 3-point line and had no issues taking and making huge shots. While he made headlines with his shooting, he was also a solid rebounder and shot blocker. He finished his time in Utah as the 9th leading scorer, 10th leading rebounder and No. 11 on the blocks list.

For his Jazz career, he averaged 15.3 points, 7.6 rebounds and 1.9 assists in 474 games.

Darrell Griffith (1980-91)

There is no doubt that Griffith would have been in strong consideration for a starting spot if not for the injuries that drastically changed his career. He was a dominant scorer who is only one of four players in team history to total more than 12,000 points.

For his career, he averaged 16.2 points, 3.3 rebounds, 2.1 assists and 1.2 steals in 765 games.

Andrei Kirilenko (2001-11)

Kirilenko was a stat-sheet stuffer during his 10 years in Salt Lake City. He was a solid scorer who could get to the rim, but was even better making the extra pass for the easy basket. Where he was at his best was however, was on defense where he is one of the best wing shot blockers in NBA history. He finished his Utah career ranked in the top seven in franchise history in scoring and rebounding while finishing in the top five in assists, steals and blocks.

For his Jazz career, he averaged 12.4 points, 5.6 rebounds, 2.8 assists, 2.0 blocks and 1.4 steals in 681 games.

Jeff Hornacek (1994-2000)

Hornacek is the best overall shooter that the Jazz have ever had and a key piece to Utah’s two finals runs. He shot 42.8 percent from 3-point range and fell just short of 90 percent from the free-throw line during his seven seasons. He was also an impressive passer who has the sixth most assists in team history.

For his Jazz career, he averaged 14.4 points, 4.0 assists, 2.8 rebounds and 1.3 steals in 477 games.

Carlos Boozer (2004-10)

For all of his flaws, Boozer was the best free agent pick-up the Jazz ever made. He could dominate a game on the glass and in the paint (when healthy). He could finish with either hand around the rim and carry the offensive load when  call upon. He is just one of three players in team history to average a double-double.

For his Jazz career, he averaged 19.3 points on 54.4 percent shooting with 10.5 rebounds, 2.9 assists and 1.0 steals in 354 games.

Deron Williams (2005-11)

After splitting time as the starting point guard with Keith McLeod and Milt Palacio as a rookie, Williams took over the reins in year two and never looked back. He averaged double figures in assists each of his last four full seasons and finished his time with the Utah as the eighth leading scorer the organization has ever had.

For his Jazz career, he averaged 17.3 points, 9.1 assists, 3.2 rebounds and 1.1 steals in 439 games.

Starters

John Stockton (1984-2003)

Stockton is the ultimate Jazz man. He was a tough-minded lead guard who did whatever it took to win. He was a 10-time all-star who made one of the three All-NBA teams 11 times and an All-Defensive Second-Team honoree on five occasions. He led the NBA in assists per game nine straight seasons while totaling 19,711 points

For his career, he averaged 13.1 points on 51.5 percent shooting with 10.5 assists, 2.7 rebounds and 2.2 steals in 1,504 games. He is still the all-time NBA leader in assists and steals. He was inducted in the Naismith Basketball Hall of Fame in 2009.

Pete Maravich (1974-1980)

Maravich was the face of the Jazz during the time when the team was stationed in New Orleans. He was an elite scorer who was known for his flair and pinpoint passing. He was a three-time all-star selection during his time in New Orleans, including the 1976-77 season when he led the league in scoring.

For his Jazz career, he averaged 25.2 points, 5.6 assists, 4.3 rebounds and 1.4 steals in 330 games. He was inducted in the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame in 1987.

Adrian Dantley (1979-1986)

While Karl Malone gets most of the recognition for his scoring ability, It’s Dantley who is the franchise leader in points per game (and it’s not even close). He was also a very efficient scorer who is the team leader in field goal percentage for players with more than 1,000 attempts. Along with his scoring prowess, he is eighth in team history in assists and 11th in rebounding.

For his Jazz career, he averaged 29.6 points on 56.2 percent shooting with 6.2 rebounds, 3.7 assists and 1.1 steals in 461 games. He was inducted in the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame in 2008.

Karl Malone (1985-2003)

Malone helped to carry the Jazz to heights the organization hadn’t seen before or since. He was a two-time MVP, an 11-time All-NBA First-Team selection, a 14-time all-star and the second leading scorer in league history.

For his Jazz career, he averaged 25.4 points on 51.7 percent shooting with 10.2 rebounds, 3.5 assists and 1.4 steals in 1,434 games. He was inducted in the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame in 2010.

Mark Eaton (1982-93)

While he didn’t provide much in the way of offense (nor was he asked to), Eaton is the best defensive player in team history. He was a terrific rim protector who challenged every shot and left opposing offenses scrambling because of his shot blocking prowess. Add in the fact that he is the second leading rebounder in team history and it’s clear that he is the only option to start at center.

For his career, he averaged 6.0 points, 7.9 rebounds, 3.5 blocks and 1.0 assists in 875 games.

 

The University of Utah football team has found the path to success int he Pac-12 conference, relying on a great defense and a terrific running attack. While they have had great teams and impressive players since joining the Pac-12, the Utes have always had talent on both sides of the ball since the football program started  They have had plenty of all-conference sections, conference players of the year and All-Americans. This team is the best of the best of those players- the ones who have made an impact on the gridiron during their time on the hill.

Here is my Utah Utes football all-time team.

Note: Players were picked based only on their play while at Utah.

Offensive line

Backups

Dean Miraldi (1978-1980)

Miraldi was a three-year starter at guard and one of the best lineman in school history. His most decorated year came in 1980 when he was a first-team All-Western Athletic Conference honoree.

John Stipech (1964-66)

While Stipech was a great player on both sides of the ball, he did enough on the offensive line to make this team. His most decorated year on offense came in 1965 when he was a first-team All-Western Athletic Conference selection at tackle. A year later, he was first-team all-conference on the defensive line.

Anthony Brown (1993-94)

Brown was on the offensive line for back-to-back bowl teams. His most decorated season came in 1994 when he was a first-team All-WAC performer for one of the best offenses in the country. He was also a third-team AP All-American.

Caleb Schlauderaff (2007-2010)

Schlauderaff was on the line for some of the best teams Utah fans have ever seen. His most decorated season came in 2010 when he was first-team All-Mountain West Conference and was a second-team All-American by Walter Camp and SI.com.

Carlton Walker (1983-84)

Walker spend two good seasons with the Utes on the offensive line. His best year came in 1984 when he started at guard and earned first-team All-Western Athletic Conference honors. He also earned FWAA first-team and second-team AP All-American recognition.

Doug Kaufusi (1998-2001)

Kaufusi was an elite lineman during his time on the hill. He was a two-time first-team All-Mountain West Conference honoree while protecting Lance Rice and Darnell Arceneaux. His most decorated season came in 2001 when he was first-team all-conference and a Sporting News third-team All-American.

Starters

Jordan Gross, tackle (1999-2002)

Gross was a dominant lineman during his time with the Utes. He didn’t allow a sack during his last two years at Utah. His most productive season came in 2002 when he was a first-team all-MWC selection, a consensus All-American and an Outland Trophy finalist.

Edward Pine (1959-1961)

Pine was a great lineman under coach Ray Nagel during his time with the Utes. He was a two-time first-team All-Skyline center and a first-team Williamson All-American in 1961.

Zane Beadles (2006-09)

Beadles is one of the best tackles to ever play for the Utes. He was a four-year starter and a two-time first-team all-conference selection. He also earned first-team All-American honors from the FWAA, College Football News and Phil Steele.

Dave Costa (1961-62)

Costa was very impressive on the line during his time with the Utes. His most decorated season came in 1962 when he earned first-team All-Western Athletic Conference at offensive tackle and the WAC lineman of the year. He was also a Williamson All-American.

Chris Kemoeatu (2001-2004)

Kemoeatu was a first-rate lineman during his time at Utah. His best year came in 2004 when he was first-team all-Mountain West Conference and a SportsIllustrated.com first-team All-American at right guard.

Running back

Backups

Stuart Vaughan  (1955-57)

Even though his rushing totals are the lowest on this list, Vaughan deserves plenty of recognition for what he did under coach Jack Curtice. His best season came in 1957 when earned first-team all-Skyline half back when he carried the ball just 28 times for 117 yards. He added 53 receptions for 756 yards and five touchdowns. Those receiving numbers placed him first in the country in catches and yards and sixth in receiving touchdowns.

Mike Anderson (1998-99)

Anderson was with the Utes for two seasons and was dominant both years. As a junior, he rushed for 1,173 yards and 12 touchdowns on 244 carries to earn first-team all-WAC. A year later he earned first-team All-MWC after finishing second in the conference in rushing yards and touchdowns.

For his Utah career, he carried the ball 439 times for 2,150 yards and 22 touchdowns to go along with five catches for 51 yards and two more scores.

John White IV (2011-2012)

White eased the Utes difficult transition from the Mountain West into the Pac-12 with two huge rushing seasons. His best year came as a junior in 2011 when he carried the ball 316 times for 1,519 yards and 15 touchdowns to go along with 13 catches for 44 yards and two more scores. Those numbers were good enough to finish second in the Pac-12 and 10th in the nation in rushing yards.

For his Utah career, he carried the ball 534 times for 2,560 yards and 23 touchdowns. He added 23 catches for 167 yards and three additional scores.

Eddie Johnson (1984-88)

Johnson did some very special things during his time as a Ute. He finished top seven in the nation in yards per carry two different seasons while crossing the 1,000 yard mark to earn first-team all-WAC. He added a third impressive season as a senior when he had 748 yards and 12 touchdowns on 157 carries to go along with 32 catches for 319 yards and three more scores.

For his Utah career, he carried the ball 564 times for 3,219 yards and 26 touchdowns to go along with 95 catches for 839 yards and nine more scores.

Starters

Devontae Booker (2014-15)

Booker had two monster seasons with the Utes even though his career was cut short with an injury. His best year came as a junior in 2014 when he finished second in the Pac-12 with 1,512 yards rushing and 10 touchdowns on 292 carries to earn all-conference recognition.

For his Utah career, he carried the ball 560 times for 2,773 yards and 21 touchdowns while catching 80 passes for 622 yards and two more scores.

Carl Monroe (1981-82)

After a solid junior campaign, Monroe took over the reins from the departed Del Rodgers and provided one of the best rushing seasons in school history. That year, he earned first-team all-WAC after he carried the ball 309 times for 1,507 yards and four touchdowns to go along with 16 catches for 108 yards and another score. Those numbers were good enough to finish seventh in the nation in rushing yards.

For his Utah career, he carried the ball 408 times for 2,029 yards and nine touchdowns as well as 30 receptions for 249 yards and one more score.

Fullback

Backup

Chris Fuamatu-Ma’afala (1995-97)

Fuamatu-Ma’afala spent three seasons carrying the ball for the Utes before he left for the NFL following his junior season. His best year came as a sophomore in 1996 when he carried the ball 168 times for 982 yards and nine touchdowns to go along with 10 catches for 80 yards to earn first-team all-WAC.

For his Utah career, he carried the ball 463 times for 2,630 yards ans 22 touchdowns. He added 15 receptions for 125 yards and another score.

Starter

Merrill Douglas (1955-57)

Douglas had some really impressive seasons during his time with the Utes. He finished one yard off the team leading in rushing in 1956 and then led the team in rushing and touchdowns a year later. His best season came in 1957 when he carried the ball 97 times for 646 yards and 10 touchdowns to go along with seven receptions for 84 yards to earn first-team all-conference fullback. His 6.7 yards-per-carry was good enough for fourth in the nation while his 10 touchdowns placed him seventh.

Wide Receiver

Backups

Steve Smith (1999-2000)

Smith was a big-play threat whenever he touched the ball during his two seasons with the Utes. His best season came in 1999 when he caught 43 passes for 860 yards and eight touchdowns. Those numbers were good enough to lead the MWC in receiving touchdowns and finish second in receiving yards and yards-per-catch. A year later, he finished sixth in the nation with 21.2 yards-per-reception.

For his Utah career, he had 78 receptions for 1,603 yards and 12 touchdowns.

Roy Jefferson (1962-64)

Even though his numbers don’t look all that impressive, Jefferson had an amazing career with the Utes. He was one of the leading receivers on the team three straight years and was a two-time first-team all-WAC selection. His most productive season on offense came in 1963 when he had 29 receptions for 435 yards and four touchdowns.

For his Utah career, he caught 70 passes for 1,166 yards and nine touchdowns.

David Reed (2008-09)

After a solid junior campaign saw Reed find the end zone six times, he had a dominant senior season in 2009. That year, he led the Mountain West Conference in receptions (81) and receiving yards (1,188 yards) to earn first-team all-conference.

For his Utah career, he caught 106 passes for 1,615 yards and 11 touchdowns.

Steve Savoy (2003-04)

Savoy would probably be higher on this list had he not left school after his sophomore year to try his hand at the NFL. His most productive season came in 2004 when he caught 67 passes for 961 yards and 11 touchdowns. He added 22 carries for 307 yards and six more scores to earn first-team all-MWC.

For his Utah career, he had 107 receptions for 1,624 yards and 18 touchdowns to go along with 27 carries for 342 yards and six scores.

Paris Warren (2003-04)

Warren spent two years at Utah dominating the Mountain West. He was named first-team all-MWC as a junior after he led the conference in receptions. A year later, he led the league in catches (80), receiving yards (1,076) and receiving touchdowns (12).

For his Utah career, he caught 156 passes for 1,885 yards and 16 touchdowns to go along with 48 carries for 281 yards and three more scores.

Louis “Speedy” Thomas (1967-68)

Even though he was only with the Utes for two seasons, Thomas was one of the best wide outs the school ever had. His best year came as a senior in 1968 when he earned first-team all-WAC after he carried the Utah receivers all season long. That year, he caught 60 passes for 1,006 yards and seven touchdowns. To put into context how impressive that was, all you have to do is look at the overall team stats.  No other Ute had more than 12 catches for 173 yards. On top of that, Utah had only nine receiving touchdowns.

For his Utah career, he had 74 receptions for 1,199 yards and eight touchdowns.

Starters

Carl Harry (1985-88)

Even though Harry led the team in receptions and receiving yards as a junior, it was what he did as a senior in 1988 that puts him on this team. That year, he earned first-team all-WAC after leading the conference in catches (65), receiving yards (1,145) ans touchdowns (14). Those numbers were also good enough to place sixth in the nation in yards and second in touchdowns.

For his Utah career, he caught 149 passes for 2,283 yards and 20 touchdowns.

Bryan Rowley (1989-1993)

Rowley had four very impressive seasons with the Utes. He led the team receiving yards three times and receptions twice on his way to becoming the leading receiver in school history. His most productive season came as a junior in 1991 when he was first-team all-WAC and second-team All-American by the Sporting News after he caught 60 passes for 1,011 yards and 11 touchdowns.

For his Utah career, he had 177 receptions for 3,143 yards and 25 touchdowns.

Kevin Dyson(1994-97)

Even though he never crossed the 1,000 yard mark during a season with the Utes, he was one of the most productive four-year players the school has ever seen. His best season came in 1996 when he earned first-team all-WAC with 53 catches for 812 yards and eight touchdowns.

For his career, he caught 192 passes for 2,726 yards and 18 touchdowns.

Steve Odom (1971-73)

While he is known more for his All-American career as a return specialist, Odom was also a fantastic receiver. One of his best years came in 1972 when he caught 30 passes for 663 yards and 11 touchdowns. Those numbers were good enough to place fourth in the nation in receiving touchdowns and fifth in yards-per-reception (22.1).

For his Utah career, he had 72 receptions for 1,440 yards and 19 touchdowns.

Tight end

Backups

Marv Fleming (1960-62)

Fleming was very productive for the Utes during all three years on the field. His best statistical season came in 1960 when he had nine catches for a team-leading 237 yards and two touchdowns. A year later, he earned first-team all-Skyline after he caught 15 passes for 193 yards and two scores.

For his Utah career, he had 35 receptions for 598 yards and six touchdowns.

Craig McEwen (1985-86)

McEwen had two very impressive seasons with the Utes. His best year came in 1986 when he had 64 catches for 721 yards and seven touchdowns. Those numbers placed him second in the WAC in receptions, third in receiving touchdowns and fourth in yards.

For his Utah career, he caught 111 passes for 1,199 yards and nine touchdowns.

Starters

Dale Nosworthy (1968-1970)

While his stats aren’t big by today’s standards, Nosworthy was a very productive tight end during his time with the Utes. His most productive season came in 1970 when he finished with 23 catches for 309 yards and three touchdowns to earn first-team all-WAC honors for the second straight year. In fact, he is the only two-time first-team all-conference tight end in school history.

For his Utah career, he had 49 receptions for 659 yards and four touchdowns.

Dennis Smith (1986-89)

Smith was part of some of the most dominant offensive units in school history. While he earned all-WAC first-team honors, he best season came in 1989. That year, he caught 73 passes for 1,091 yards and 18 touchdowns. Those numbers placed him sixth in the nation in receptions and yards as well as second in receiving touchdowns.

For his Utah career, he had 156 catches for 2,168 yards and 24 touchdowns.

Quarterback

Backups

Scott Mitchell (1987-89)

The Utes didnt have a great deal of success with Mitchell under center, but most of that was because of a lackluster defense. His best season came in 1988 when Utah finished 6-5 after he led the nation in passing yards, total yards and passing touchdowns while finishing fourth in total touchdowns and ninth in passing efficiency rating. That year, he completed 60.6 percent of his passes for 4,322 yards and 29 touchdowns.

For his Utah career, he still holds the school records for passing yards (8,981) and touchdown passes (69).

Lee Grosscup (1957-58)

Grosscup played just two seasons at Utah, but was one of the most successful signal callers in school history. He had his best year in 1957 when he led the Utes to a 6-4 record and a Skyline Conference championship. That season, he completed 68.6 percent of his passes while leading the nation in passing yards (1,398) and 10 touchdowns with just two interceptions. Those numbers were good enough to earn first team all-conference and All-American honors and finish 10th in the voting for the Heisman Trophy.

For his Utah career, he completed 62.1 percent of his passes for 2,226 yards and 13 touchdowns to go along with seven rushing scores.

Starters

Alex Smith (2002-04)

Smith played spent most of two seasons as the Utah starting quarterback and won 21 of 22 starts before he left for the NFL. His best season came in 2004 when he won MWC offensive player of the year and finished fourth in the voting for the Heisman Trophy after he led Utah to a 12-0 record. That year, he completed 67.5 percent of his passes for 2,952 yards with 32 touchdowns and just four interceptions. he also had 631 yards and 10 scores in the running game.

For his Utah career, he completed 66.3 percent of his passes for 5,203 yards and 47 touchdowns with eight interceptions to go along with 1,072 yards and 15 scores on the ground.

Defensive line

Backups

Norman McBride (1967-68)

McBride had two terrific seasons on the defensive line for the Utes under Mike Giddings and Bill Meek. Even though the team struggled both seasons, he was a first-team All-Western Athletic Conference during each year.

Steve Fifita (2002-05)

Fifita lived in the opponent’s backfield during three of his years on the defensive line. He earned all-conference recognition three straight years, including first-team All-MWC as a junior and senior. His best statistical season came in 2004 when he totaled 46 tackles, 13 tackles for loss, five sacks, two pass break-ups and an interception return for a touchdown.

For his Utah career, he recorded 137 tackles, 32.5 tackles for loss, 13 sacks, eight pass break-ups and two interceptions.

Garrett Smith (1999-2002)

Smith had a great career on the defensive line. He was a three-time all-conference honoree, including back-to-back years as first-team All-MWC. One of his best statistical seasons came in 2000 when he recorded 72 tackles, 12 tackles for loss, 10 quarterback hurries, seven sacks and three pass break-ups.

For his Utah career, he totaled 207 tackles, 34.5 tackles for loss, 18 hurries, 12 pass break-ups and 11 sacks.

Ron Rydalch (1971-73)

Rydalch was one of the best players on the Utes defense during the early 70’s. His best season came in 1973 when he was first-team all-conference and the WAC Defensive Player of the Year after he recorded 81 tackles and four pass break-ups.

For his Utah career, he totaled 199 tackles, four pass break-ups and a tackle for loss.

Jason Kaufusi (2000-03)

Kaufusi had an amazing career on the defensive line before injuries ended his career. He was a three-time all-conference selection, including a two-time first-time All-MWC performer. One of his best statistical season came as a freshman when he had 63 tackles, 16 tackles for loss, seven quarterback hurries, 6.5 sacks and five pass break-ups.

For his Utah career, he totaled 137 tackles, 38.5 tackles for loss, 16 sacks, 11 pass break-ups, nine hurries and two forced fumbles.

John Frank (1996-99)

Frank was a great player on the defensive line. He was a two-time all-conference selection and the 1999 Mountain West Conference Player of the Year. That year, he had 56 tackles, 20 tackles for loss, 18 quarterback hurries, 13 sacks and three forced fumbles.

For his Utah career, he totaled 124 tackles, 29 tackles for loss, 27 sacks, 18 hurries, six forced fumbles and five pass break-ups.

Starters

Star Lotulelei (2010-12)

Lotulelei was a dominating force for the Utes on the defensive line. He was a two-time All-Pac-12 performer and a first-team All-American. One of his best years came in 2012 when he was an AP first-team All-American after he totaled 42 tackles, 10 tackles for loss, five sacks, three pass break-ups and three forced fumbles.

For his Utah career, he had 107 tackles, 21.5 tackles for loss, seven sacks, four pass break-ups and four forced fumbles.

Luther Elliss (1991-94)

Elliss had a legendary career on the defensive line for the Utes. He was a three-time first-team All-WAC performer and a consensus All-American. One of his best seasons came in 1994 when he was the WAC Defensive Player of the Year and a first-team All-American after he totaled 78 tackles, nine tackles for loss, four sacks and a forced fumble.

For his Utah career, he totaled 239 tackles, 47 tackles for loss, 18 sacks and five pass break-ups.

Steve Clark (1978-1981)

Clark was a premier defensive lineman during his time on the hill. He was a two-time first-team All-WAC performer and a first-team All-American. One of his best seasons came in 1981 when he was a FWAA first-team All-American after he totaled 62 tackles and 12 sacks.

For his Utah career, he registered 213 tackles, 12 sacks, two forced fumbles and two pass break-ups.

Nate Orchard (2011-14)

Orchard was a huge piece of the Utes defense on the defensive line. His best year came in 2014 when he earned first-team All-Pac-12 and first-team All-American honors after he recorded 84 tackles, 21 tackles for loss, 18.5 sacks and three forced fumbles.

For his Utah career, he totaled 186 tackles, 39.5 tackles for loss, 25 sacks, 10 pass break-ups and eight forced fumbles.

Linebacker

Backups

Garland Harris (1986-89)

Harris was very productive during all four of his seasons as a linebacker. One of his most impressive years came in 1988 when he was a second-team All-WAC and honorable mention All-American after he totaled 102 tackles, eight tackles for loss, four quarterback hurries and two pass break-ups.

For his Utah career, he recorded 324 tackles, 20 tackles for loss, 16 hurries, eight pass break-ups, five sacks and three forced fumbles.

Trevor Reilly (2010-13)

Reilly made a huge impact on defense during his four years with the Utes. His most productive season came in 2013 when he was first-team All-Pac-12 and an AP honorable mention All-American after he registered 100 tackles, 16 tackles for loss, 8.5 sacks and two pass break-ups.

For his Utah career, he totaled 235 tackles, 37 tackles for loss, 20 sacks, nine pass break-ups and eight forced fumbles.

Bill Gompf (1978-1981)

Gompf had three great seasons as a linebacker for the Utes and was a two-time all-conference selection. One of his best years came in 1981 when he was first-team All-WAC after he recorded 128 tackles, nine pass break-ups, five sacks, three forced fumbles and three interceptions.

For his Utah career, he totaled 380 tackles, 18 pass break-ups, 10 interceptions, eight sacks and five forced fumbles.

Mark Rexford (1993-94)

Rexford was an elite linebacker during his two years on the hill. One of his best seasons came in 1994 when he was first-team All-WAC after he totaled 111 tackles, six tackles for loss, four forced fumbles, three pass break-ups and a sack.

For his career, he registered 223 tackles, seven tackles for loss, six forced fumbles and five pass break-ups.

Mark Blosch (1981-1984)

Blosch was a tackling machine as a linebacker with the Utes and a three-time all-conference selection. One of his best years came in 1984 when he was first-team All-Western Athletic Conference after he totaled 123 tackles, four sacks, three tackles for loss and two interceptions.

For his Utah career, he recorded 495 tackles, eight sacks, six tackles for loss, five pass break-ups, three interceptions and two forced fumbles.

Stevenson Sylvester (2006-09)

Sylvester had three good years as a linebacker for the Utes. One of his best years came in 2009 when he was first-team All-MWC after he had 81 tackles, five tackles for loss, two sacks, two pass break-ups and an interception.

For his Utah career, he recorded 262 tackles, 24.5 tackles for loss, 12 pass break-ups, nine sacks, four forced fumbles and two interceptions.

Starters

Filipo Mokofisi (1982-85)

Mokofisi made an impact on the defense during all four seasons. His best year came in 1984 when he was a first-team all-conference performer and the WAC Defensive Player of the Year after he recorded 86 tackles, 20 tackles for loss, nine sacks, four forced fumbles and three pass break-ups.

For his Utah career, he totaled 264 tackles, 47 tackles for loss, 26 sacks, 11 pass break-ups and seven forced fumbles.

Kautai Olevao (1995, 1998-2000)

Olevao has a big hitter during his four years as a linebacker and was a three-time first-team all-conference selection. His best statistical year came in 1998 when he had 77 tackles, nine tackles for loss, six pass break-ups, four sacks and two forced fumbles.

For his Utah career, he recorded 240 tackles, 25 tackles for loss, 14 pass break-ups, 11 sacks and six quarterback hurries.

Anthony Davis (1990-91)

Davis was a two-time first-team All-Western Athletic Conference performer as a linebacker during his two years. One of his best years came in 1990 when he had 87 tackles, 10 tackles for loss, four sacks, three quarterback hurries, an interception and a forced fumble.

For his Utah career, he totaled 193 tackles, 13 tackles for loss, nine sacks, three hurries and two forced fumbles.

John Huddleston (1973-75)

Huddleston was one of the most prolific tackles in Utes history. His best season came in 1974 when he was first-team All-Western Athletic Conference after he recorded 157 tackles, three pass break-ups and an interception.

For his Utah career, he totaled 406 tackles, six pass break-ups, two interceptions, two tackles for loss and a forced fumble.

Secondary

Backups

Andre Dyson (1997-2000)

Dyson had three impressive seasons in the Utah secondary and was a two-time all-conference performer. His most productive season came in 2000 when he was first-team All-MWC after he totaled 65 tackles, 17 pass break-ups and four tackles for loss. He also led the conference with four interceptions, including a nation-leading three returns for touchdowns.

For his Utah career, he recorded 147 tackles, 47 pass break-ups, 10 interceptions, six tackles for loss and two forced fumbles.

Robert Love (1995-98)

Love had three great seasons in the Utah secondary and was a three-time All-WAC selection. One of his best years came in 1998 when he was first-team all-conference after he had 76 tackles, six pass break-ups, three tackles for loss and two interceptions.

For his Utah career, he recorded 284 tackles, 14 pass break-ups, nine tackles for loss, seven sacks, three forced fumbles and three interceptions.

Eric Jacobsen (1984, 1986-88)

Jacobsen starred in the secondary for two years during his time on the hill. One of his most impressive years came in 1987 after he totaled 138 tackles, seven interceptions, five pass break-ups, five forced fumbles, three quarterback hurries, two sacks and two tackles for loss.

For his Utah career, he recorded 338 tackles, 14 pass break-ups, 11 interceptions, six forced fumbles and five sacks.

Norm Thompson (1969-1970)

Thompson had two great seasons in the Utah secondary. He was a two-time first-team All-Western Athletic Conference performer and an All-American. His most productive year came in 1970 when he was first-team all-conference and an AP second-team All-American after he totaled a team-leading seven interceptions.

For his Utah career, he totaled 12 interceptions with three returned for touchdowns.

Jeff Griffin (1977-1980)

Griffin had a standout career in the secondary for the Utes. He was a two-time first-team All-WAC selection and a second-team All-American. One of his best years came in 1980 when he was N.E.A. second-team All-American after he totaled 81 tackles, three pass break-ups, three interceptions and three forced fumbles.

For his Utah career, he recorded 304 tackles, 24 pass break-ups, 13 interceptions, five forced fumbles and three interception returns for touchdowns.

LaVon Edwards (1988-1991)

Edwards was four-year contributor in the secondary and was a three-time all-conference selection. One of his most impressive seasons came in 1991 when he was first-team All-WAC after he totaled 57 tackles, five interceptions and five pass break-ups.

For his Utah career, he totaled 211 tackles, 33 pass break-ups, 17 interceptions and a forced fumbles. He was also an impressive return man where he averaged 21.6 yards on 53 kick returns and 8.0 yards on 112 punt returns.

Harold Lusk (1993-96)

Lusk was a huge part of the secondary during all four seasons with the Utes. He was a two-time first team all-conference performer and an honorable mention All-American. One of his best years came in 1995 when he recorded 82 tackles, eight pass break-ups and six interceptions.

For his Utah career, he totaled 285 tackles, 19 interceptions, 18 pass break-ups, two tackles for loss and a forced fumble.

Starters

Eric Weddle (2003-06)

Weddle did just about everything for the Utes in the secondary during his time on the hill. He was a two-time first-team All-MWC selection, a two-time MWC defensive player of the year and a consensus All-American. One of his best statistical season came in 2005 when he totaled 77 tackles, 12 pass break-ups, 10.5 tackles for loss, four sacks, four interceptions and three forced fumbles.

For his Utah career, he recorded 277 tackles, 23 pass break-ups, 22.5 tackles for loss, 10 sacks and nine forced fumbles.

Larry Wilson (1957-59)

Wilson was a star on both sides of the ball and on special teams during his time with the Utes. His best season on offense came in 1959 when he was third-team Williamson All-America and first-team all-conference after he carried the ball 98 times for 559 yards and eight touchdowns. He added 21 receptions for 215 yards and four more scores. His 12 touchdowns from scrimmage was fourth most in the nation.

For his Utah career, he carried the ball 230 times for 1,220 yards and 11 touchdowns to go along with 43 receptions for 593 yards and eight more scores while making plenty of plays on defense. He also averaged 26.1 yards on 26 kick returns.

Erroll Tucker (1984-85)

Tucker was a great return man and a huge part of the secondary. One of his most productive seasons on defense came in 1985 when he was first-team All-WAC after he had 70 tackles, nine pass break-ups, six interceptions and five tackles for loss.

For his Utah career, he totaled 118 tackles, 14 pass break-ups, eight interceptions and six tackles for loss.

Morgan Scalley (2001-04)

Scalley was a key piece to one of the best defenses in Utes history and a solid return man. He was a two-time all-conference honoree and an All-American. One of his most productive seasons came in 2004 when he was first-team All-MWC and a second-team AP All-American after he totaled 51 tackles, six interceptions, 2.5 sacks and 2.5 tackles for loss.

For his Utah career, he recorded 134 tackles, 8.5 tackles for loss, eight interceptions,four pass break-ups and 3.5 tackles for loss.

Backup punter

Tom Hackett, punter (2012-15) 

Hackett had a legendary career punting for the Utes. He was a consensus All-American as a junior and senior and won the Ray Guy Award as the nation’s best punter each year. His best season came in 2015 when he led the nation, averaging 48 yards per punt on 61 attempts.

For his Utah career, he averaged 45.2 yards per punt on 242 attempts.

Starting punter

Marv Bateman (1969-1971)

Bateman was a legendary punter and kicker during his time with the Utes. He was a two-time All-WAC performer and a two-time All-American. His best year came in 1971 when he was named a first-team All-American by two publications after he broke the NCAA record when he averaged 48.1 on 68 punts.

For his Utah career, he averaged 46.9 yards on 133 punts and had 118 points as a kicker.

Backup kicker

Joe Phillips (2009-2010)

Phillips had two tremendous seasons as the Utah kicker. He finished sixth in the nation in 2009 when he made 90.9 percent of his field goals. A year later. he was named first-team All-MWC after he converted on 55-of-56 extra points and made 13-of-17 field goals.

For his Utah career, he missed two of 95 extra points and hit on 84.6 percent of his field goals.

Starting kicker

Louie Sakoda (2005-08)

Sakoda is the most decorated special teams player in Utah history. He is a three-time Mountain West Conference special teams player of the year and was a first-team All-American as both a kicker and a punter. His best year came in 2008 when he was a consensus All-American kicker after 56-of-57 extra points and 22-of-24 field goals.

For his Utah career, he averaged 42.1 yards on 242 punts  while hitting 86.3 percent of his 66 field goal attempts.

Punt returner

Steve Smith (1999-2000)

Smith was an explosive return man during his time with the Utes. His best year came in 1999 when he scored on three times and averaged 17.1 yards on his 29 punt returns to earn first-team All-Mountain West Conference. He also averaged 28.2 yards on six kick returns.

For his Utah career, he returned 72 punts for 860 yards and four touchdowns and averaged 22 yards on 23 kick returns.

Shaky Smithson (2009-2010)

Smithson was a dynamic punt returner during his time with the Utes. His best year came in 2010 when he was a Walter Camp first-team All-American after he led the nation in punt return yards (572) and average per return (19.1). He also finished second in the country with two punt return touchdowns.

For his Utah career, he averaged 16.2 yards with two touchdowns on 43 punt returns to go along with a 24.4 yard average on 43 kick returns.

Kaelin Clay (2014) 

Clay had a terrific season as a return man during his only year on the field with the Utes. He was a first-team all-conference selection after he led the Pac-12 with 346 yards and three touchdowns on 23 punt returns. He also had 22 kick returns for 548 yards and another touchdown. Those numbers were good enough to lead the nation in punt return touchdowns and earn him CBSSports.com first-team All-American.

Kicker returner

Erroll Tucker (1984-85) 

Tucker was a dominating return man during his two seasons on the hill. He was a two-time first-team All-WAC performer. His best season came in 1985 when he was first-team all-conference and was named a first-team All-American by three publications after he led the nation in punt return (24.3) and kick return average (29.1). That year, he finished with 24 kicks returns for 698 yards and two touchdowns to go long with 16 punt returns for 389 yards and two more scores.

For his Utah career, he averaged 26.6 yards with two touchdowns on 41 kick returns as well as 17.0 yards and three scores on 38 punt returns.

Steve Odom (1971-73)

Odom was a star return man during each of his three seasons with the Utes. His best season came in 1973 when he was a FWAA first-team All-American after he averaged 29.5 yards with a touchdown on 21 returns. He added 13 punt returns for 304 yards and two more scores.

For his Utah career, he averaged 26.1 on 99 kick returns with four touchdowns to go along with a 20.3 yard average and four scores on 27 punt returns.

Reggie Dunn (2010-12)

Although he didn’t have many kick returns, Dunn was a threat to take the score any time a team made the mistake to kick to him. His best season came in 2012 when was a first-team All-Pac-12 honoree and a first-team All-American after he led the nation with four kick return touchdowns while averaging 51.3 yards per kick return.

For his Utah career, he averaged 30.9 yards per return and had five touchdowns on 48 returns.

The BYU Cougars have been one of the most consistent teams in college football since LaVell Edwards took over the reigns more than 40 years ago. A lot of that success has to do with the level of talent the Cougars have been able to put on the field year in and year out. They have had plenty of all-conference selections on both sides of the ball, including All-Americans and national award winners.

With so many talented players to choose from, coming up with the all-time team wasn’t an easy task. Some positions were tougher than others, including quarterback where there are more than half a dozen great options.

Here is a look at my BYU football all-time team.

Offense

Offensive line

Backups

Matt Reynolds (2008-2011)

Reynolds started all 52 games he played and is one of the most decorated lineman in school history. He was a first-team All-MWC performer during his sophomore and junior seasons and an All-Independent selection as a senior. He also earned All-American recognition as both a freshman and a sophomore.

Ray Feinga (2004-08)

Feinga had an outstanding career protecting Max Hall and John Beck. He was a two-time first-team All-MWC selection at left guard. His best year came in 2007 when he didn’t allow a sack, according to BYUCougars.com, and was a SI.com second-team All-American.

Dallas Reynolds (2005-08)

Reynolds was a great player during all four seasons with the Cougars. He was a two-time first-team All-MWC selection and earned All-American recognition during his freshman and senior years. His best year came in 2008 when he was first-team all-conference and third-team All-American by the College Football News.

Trevor Matich (1979-1080, 1983-84)

Although it took a few years for Matich to earn the full-time starting job at center, he ended his BYU with a dominating senior year for the National Championship team. He was an All-WAC first-team selection and Associated Press third-team All-American.

Evan Pilgrim (1990-94)

Pilgrim was a big piece of some really good offensive lines. He started for much of his career and earned plenty of recognition along the way. He was a Football News second-team sophomore All-American, as well as first-team All-WAC and AP second-team All-American as a senior in 1994.

John Tait (1993, 1996-98)

Tait showed off his tremendous ability during his time on the line with the Cougars. He was a two-time first-team all-conference performer and a Sporting News freshman All-American. He was inducting in the BYU Hall of Fame in 2012.

Starters

Bart Oates (1977, 1980-82)

Oates was a huge part of some very successful Cougar squads during his time in Provo. His best year came in 1982 when he was a first-team All-WAC selection at center and a second-team All-American. He was inducted in the BYU Hall of Fame in 1992.

Gordon Gravelle (1967-71)

Gravelle had a terrific career, as a Cougar lineman. His best year came in 1971 when he was WAC lineman of the Year. He also earned second-team All-American recognition from the AP, UPI and Universal Sports. He was inducted into the BYU Hall of Fame in 2012.

Brad Oates (1973-75)

He spent three years at BYU after transferring from Duke and was a phenomenal tackle. He was a two-time first-team All-WAC selection and one of the team’s captains in his last two years. His best year came in 1975 when he was an Associated Press second-team All-American. He was inducted in the BYU Hall of Fame in 1988.

Nick Eyre (1976-1980)

Eyre was one of the best tackles that the Cougars have ever had. He was a three-year starter and a team captain. He was a two-time first-team All-WAC honoree and the first lineman from BYU to earn consensus All-American. He was inducted in the BYU Hall of Fame in 1990.

Mo Elewonibi (1988-89)

After starting one game as a junior, according to BYUCougars.com, Elewonibi stepped up as a senior and had one of the best years of any lineman in school history. He was a consensus first-team All-American and won the Outland trophy as the best interior lineman in the nation.

Running back

Backups

Jeff Blanc (1973-76)

Blanc was the first great dual-threat back the Cougars had. He earned first-team All-WAC in his last two seasons and finished as the BYU career leader in rushing yards and touchdowns. His most productive season came as a sophomore in 1974 when he carried the ball 199 times for 784 yards and six touchdowns while catching 32 passes for 442 yards and four more scores.

For his BYU career, he had 625 carries for 2,718 yards and 21 touchdowns to go along with 74 receptions for 886 yards and eight scores.

Pete Van Valkenburg (1969-1972)

After two solid years, Van Valkenburg gave BYU one of the special seasons by a back in school history as a senior in 1972. That year, he led the nation in rushing with 1,386 yards to go along with 12 touchdowns even though he wasn’t even in the top 10 in carries. He also finished second in yards from scrimmage to earn first-team All-WAC and AP third-team All-American.

For his BYU career, he carried the ball 456 times for 2,392 yards and 24 touchdowns to go along with 25 catches for 280 yards and two scores.

Jamal Willis (1991-94)

Willis had two great years during his time as a Cougar. He was the first BYU back to cross the 1,000-yard plateau on two occasions and finished his career as the school’s all-time leader in rushing yards and touchdowns. His best season came as a senior in 1994 when he earned first-team All-WAC and finished top 10 in the nation in yards and touchdowns from scrimmage. That year, he carried the ball 204 times for 1042 yards and 12 touchdowns as well as catching 33 passes for 525 yards and two more scores.

For his BYU career, he had 594 carries for 2,970 yards and 35 touchdowns to go along with 77 catches for 1,095 yards and five scores.

Curtis Brown (2002-06)

Brown was a do everything back during his time in Provo. He was the first player to have back-to-back 1,000-yard seasons and earned first-team All-MWC twice. His most productive season came as a junior in 2005 when he rushed for 1,123 yards and 14 touchdowns while catching 53 passes for 454 yards and two more scores.

He finished his BYU career, with 641 carries for 3,221 yards and 31 touchdowns to go along with 157 catches for 1,309 yards and five scores. He also returned 22 kicks for 466 yards.

Starters

Harvey Unga (2006-2009)

When Unga was on the field, he was one of the most dominant backs BYU fans have ever seen. During his time as a Cougar, he won MWC freshman of the year, was second-team All-MWC as a sophomore and first-team All-MWC as a junior. His most productive statistical season came as a freshman in 2007 when he carried the ball 244 times for 1,227 yards and 13 touchdowns while catching 44 passes for 655 yards and four more scores.

For his BYU career, he carried the ball 696 times for a school record 3,455 yards and 36 touchdowns to go along with 102 catches for 1,085 yards and nine scores.

Luke Staley (1999-2001)

Staley did three things at BYU that set him apart from all other running backs. He won the MWC offensive player of the year award, was a consensus first-team All-American and won the Doak Walker Award as the nation’s most outstanding running back. All of those honors came as a junior in 2001 when he lead the nation in rushing touchdowns (24) and touchdowns from scrimmage (28). He also finished second nationally in rushing yards (1,596), yards per carry (8.1) and yards from scrimmage (1,930).

For his BYU career, he had 418 carries for 2,507 yards and 41 touchdowns to go along with 86 catches for 1,000 yards and seven scores. His 48 touchdowns are still a school record.

Fullback

Backup

Naufahu Tahi (1999, 2002-05)

While his overall numbers don’t compare to some of the players already on the list, the reason why he is this high is because he was also an incredibly gifted blocker. His best season came as a senior in 2005 when he had 97 carries for 497 yards and six touchdowns. He also manged 41 catches for 375 yards and another score.

For his BYU career, he carried the ball 326 times for 1,358 yards and 14 touchdowns to go along with 81 receptions for 730 yards and five scores.

Starter

Todd Christensen (1974-77)

While he never got full-time touches in the running game, Christensen was fantastic catching the ball out of the backfield. One of his most productive seasons came as a senior in 1977 when he earned first-team All-WAC. That year, he had 79 carries for 290 yards and three touchdowns while making 50 receptions for 603 yards and five more scores.

For his BYU career, he carried the ball 276 times for 1,072 yards and eight touchdowns to go along with 158 catches for 1,619 yards and 13 scores.

Tight end

Backups

Chris Smith (1987-1990)

Smith had two legendary seasons during his time in Provo. His was a two-time, first-team All-WAC selection who earned All-American honors during his junior and senior seasons. His best year came in 1990 when he was a consensus All-American after he broke the NCAA record in receiving yards for a tight end (1,154), according to BYUCougars.com.

For his BYU career, he caught 137 passes for 2,367 yards and eight touchdowns.

Dennis Pitta (2004, 07-09)

Pitta was an extraordinary offensive weapon during his time as a Cougar. He was a three-time, first-team All-MWC selection and a consensus All-American in 2009. His best statistical season came in 2008 when he caught 83 passes for 1,083 yards and six touchdowns.

For his BYU career, he had 221 receptions for 2,901 yards and 21 touchdowns.

Starters

Clay Brown (1976-1980)

While a lot of fans remember him for just one play, Brown was a dominant force as a tight end. He was first-team All-WAC two straight seasons as a tight end and a very accomplished punter. His best year came in 1980 when he caught 48 passes for 1,009 yards and 15 touchdowns. Those numbers were good enough to lead the nation in touchdowns, finish third in receiving yards and ninth in yards-per-catch (21).

For his BYU career, he had 88 receptions for 1,691 yards and 17 touchdowns. while averaging 41.8 yards on 118 punts.

Gordon Hudson (1980-83)

Hudson produced for the Cougars no matter who was throwing him the football. He was a two-time, first-team All-WAC selection and a two-time consensus All-American. One of his most impressive statistical seasons came in 1981 when he caught 67 passes for 960 yards and 10 touchdowns.

For his BYU career, he had 178 receptions for 2,484 yards and 22 touchdowns. He ended his time as a Cougar as the all-time NCAA leader in receiving yards by a tight end, according to BYUCougars.com. He was inducted in the College Football Hall of Fame in 2009.

Wide receiver

Backups

Glen Kozlowski (1981, 83-85)

Kozlowski was one of the best receivers in the WAC during his time at BYU. His most productive season came as a junior when he earned first-team All-WAC and honorable mention All-American by the AP, UPI and Football News. That year, he finished second in the conference in catches (55) and receiving yards (879) while leading the conference and finishing second in the nation with 11 touchdowns.

For his BYU career, he caught 136 passes for 2,223 yards and 23 touchdowns.

Todd Watkins (2004-05)

Watkins only spent two seasons on the field for BYU, But both were memorable. His most impressive seasons came as a junior when he led the MWC in yards per reception (20.0) and was the regular season leader in receiving yards to earn first-team All-WAC. That year, he caught 52 passes for 1,042 yards and six touchdowns.

For his BYU career, he recorded 101 receptions for 1,720 yards and 15 touchdowns.

Mark Bellini (1982-86)

Bellini had three very productive seasons as a Cougar, including two years as a first-team All-WAC performer. His best year came as a junior in 1985 when he was named second-team All-American by UPI and third-team All-American by the AP. That year, he led the nation in touchdown catches (14) and finished sixth in receiving yards (1,008).

For his BYU career, he caught 146 passes for 2,429 and 23 touchdowns.

Reno Mahe (1998-99, 2001-02)

Mahe made the switch to wide receiver when he returned to BYU and had an instant impact. His best season came as a junior in 2001 when he earned first-team All-MWC honors after putting together one of the best statistical seasons in BYU history. That year, he led the conference in receptions (91), receiving yards (1,211) and touchdowns (nine). Those numbers were good enough to finish fifth in the nation in receptions and 10th in receiving yards.

During his two seasons as a receiver, he caught 150 passes for 1,982 yards and 11 touchdowns.

Andy Boyce (1984, 1987-1990)

Boyce had a tremendous career as a Cougar even though he didn’t record his first catch until his junior year. His most productive season came as a senior in 1990 when he earned first-team All-WAC. That season, he finished second in the nation in receptions (79) as well as third nationally in both receiving yards (1,241) and receiving touchdowns (13).

For his BYU career, he caught 118 passes for 1,953 yards and 15 touchdowns.

Margin Hooks (1996-2000)

Hooks had three very good years at BYU. His most impressive season came as a junior in 1999 when he earned first team All-MWC after he led the conference in receptions (60) and receiving yards (1,067) and finished second in touchdowns (seven).

For his BYU career, he caught 189 passes for 2,841 yards and 14 touchdowns.

Starters

Eric Drage (1989-1993)

Drage is one of five BYU receivers to earn first-team all-conference at least twice and the only Cougar to have more than 1,000 yards receiving more than once. His most impressive season came as a junior in 1992 when he was first team All-WAC after catching 56 passes for 1,093 yards and 12 touchdowns. Those numbers placed him second in the nation in receiving touchdowns and ninth in receiving yards.

For his BYU career, he caught 162 passes for 3,065 yards and 29 touchdowns. He also returned 18 punts for 142 yards.

Cody Hoffman (2009-2013)

Hoffman had a spectacular career as a Cougar as a receiver and return man. In fact, he owns the BYU school records for receptions, receiving yards and receiving touchdowns. His best season came as a junior in 2012 when he registered 100 receptions for 1,248 yards and 11 touchdowns to earn All-Independent first-team.

For his BYU career, he caught 260 passes for 3,612 yards and 33 touchdowns.

Phil Odle (1965-67)

Although he isn’t close to the top of the BYU leader board for receivers anymore, Odle is still one of the best Cougar receivers ever. He earned first-team All-WAC honors three straight years and finished in the top 10 in the nation twice each in receptions, receiving yards and receiving touchdowns. He also ended his BYU career at second on the all-time list for receptions in college football, according to BYUCougars.com. His most productive season came as a senior in 1967 when he caught 77 passes for 971 yards and nine touchdowns to earn first-team All-American by Dell Sports.

For his BYU career, he caught 183 passes for 2,548 yards and 25 touchdowns.

Austin Collie (2004, 07-08)

Even though he only played three seasons as a Cougar before he moved on to the NFL, Collie is the best receiver that BYU has ever had and a great kick returner. His best year came as a junior in 2008 when he earned first-team All-MWC and first-team All-American from CBSSports.com after he finished with 106 receptions for 1,538 yards and 15 touchdowns.

For his BYU career, he caught 215 passes for 3,255 yards and 30 touchdowns.

Quarterback

Backups

Steve Young (1980-83)

While not the first great running quarterback at BYU, Young was the best. While he was known for his great running skills, he was also a tremendous passer. His best season came in 1983 when finished second in the Heisman voting, won the Davey O’Brien and Sammy Baugh Awards and was a consensus All-American after he led the Cougars to an 11-1 season and a Holiday Bowl victory. That year, he completed 71.3 percent of his passes for 3,902 yards and 33 touchdowns to go along with 444 yards and eight scores on the ground.

For his BYU career, he completed 65.2 percent of his passes for 7,733 yards and 56 touchdowns. He added 1,084 yards and 18 scores in the running game. He was elected to the College Football Hall of Fame in 2001.

Jim McMahon (1977-1981)

McMahon won just about every award he could win while at BYU outside of the Heisman Trophy (he finished third in the voting in ’81 and fifth in ’80). He won the Davey O’Brien and Sammy Baugh and was a consensus All-American in 1981 as a senior, but had arguably a better year as a junior. That season, he completed 63.8 percent of his passes for 4,571 yards and 47 touchdowns for the 12-1 Cougars.

For his BYU career, he completed 61.6 percent of his passes for 9,536 yards and 84 touchdowns as well as 10 rushing scores. He was elected to the College Football Hall of Fame in 1999.

Starter

Ty Detmer (1987-1991)

Detmer had three legendary seasons as a signal caller at BYU and is the only player in school history to win the Heisman Trophy. On top of that, he was a two-consensus All-American who won the Sammy Baugh Trophy, the Maxwell Award as the college football player of the Year and was the first two-time winner of the Davey O’Brien Award in college football history. One of his extraordinary seasons came in 1990 when he completed 64.2 percent of his passes for 5,188 yards and 41 touchdowns for the 10-3 Cougars.

For his BYU career, he completed 62.6 percent of his passes for 15,031 yards and 121 touchdowns to go along with 14 scores on the ground. He was elected to the College Football Hall of Fame in 2012.

Defense

Defensive line

Backups

Paul Linford (1972-74)

Linford was a dominant presence on the defensive line for the Cougars and a three-time first-team All-Western Athletic Conference performer. One of his best seasons came in 1974 when he had 53 tackles, seven sacks, seven tackles for loss and six quarterback hurries.

For his BYU career, he registered 201 tackles, 24 tackles for loss, 22 hurries, seven sacks and four forced fumbles.

Wayne Baker (1972-74)

Baker spent three years on the defensive line for the Cougars. His best year came in 1974 when he was a second-team All-American after he had 82 tackles, 10 sacks, nine quarterback hurries, four tackles for loss and three forced fumbles.

For his BYU career, he had 179 tackles, 11 tackles for loss, 10 sacks, nine quarterback hurries and four forced fumbles.

Glen Titensor (1978-1980)

Titensor had two great seasons during his time with the Cougars. He was a two-time first-team All-WAC selection and an AP honorable mention All-American. One of his best years came in 1980 when he totaled 41 tackles, 38 quarterback hurries, 13 sacks and five tackles for loss.

For his BYU career, he recorded 88 tackles, 57 hurries, 17 sacks, 12 tackles for loss and three forced fumbles.

Randy Brock (1991-94)

Brock stared all four seasons on the defensive line. He was a Football News freshman and sophomore first-team All-American selection and an All-WAC first-team honoree in 1994. One of his best years came as a senior when he had 53 tackles, 22 quarterback hurries, 13 tackles for loss, eight sacks and seven forced fumbles.

For his BYU career, he had 175 tackles, 59 hurries, 46 tackles for loss, 28.5 sacks and 12 forced fumbles.

Brad Anae (1979-1981)

Anae was a terrific pass rusher during his time with the Cougars. He was two-time first-team All-WAC selection and an AP honorable mention All-American. His most productive season came in 1980 when he had 37 tackles, 30 quarterback hurries, nine sacks, five tackles for loss and an interception return for a touchdown.

For his BYU career, he recorded 94 tackles, 51 hurries, 21 sacks, 14 tackles for loss and six forced fumbles.

Brandon Flint (1980-83)

Flint terrorized opposing quarterbacks during his time with the Cougars. He led team in sacks each of his last three seasons. One of his best years came in 1983 when he was an AP All-American after he recorded 57 tackles, 31 quarterback hurries and 12 sacks.

For his BYU career, he totaled 194 tackles, 64 quarterback hurries, a school-record 35 sacks and 14 tackles for loss.

Starters

Mekeli Ieremia (1974-77)

Ieremia had three fantastic seasons on the defensive line while in Provo. He was a two-time first-team All-Western Athletic Conference performer and a two-time AP honorable mention All-American. One of his best seasons came in 1976 when he had 95 tackles, 17 quarterback hurries, a single-season school-record 17 sacks and eight tackles for loss.

For his BYU career, he had 257 tackles, 42 hurries, 27 sacks, 15 tackles for loss and five forced fumbles.

Shawn Knight (1983-86)

Knight was a very good player on the defensive line during his last two seasons with the Cougars. His best year came in 1986 when he was an AP third-team All-American after he totaled 60 tackles, 16 sacks, eight quarterback hurries and four tackles for loss.

For his BYU career, he had 126 tackles, 27 hurries, 23 sacks, seven tackles for loss and three forced fumbles.

Jan Jorgensen (2006-09)

Jorgensen was a huge part of the Cougars front seven during each of his seasons at BYU. After earning third-team freshman All-American honors, he was an All-MWC first-team performer during each of his last three years. His best season came as a sophomore in 2007 when he had 77 tackles, including 20 for loss and 13.5 sacks.

For his BYU career, he had 221 tackles, including 44 for loss to go along with 30 sacks, 22 quarterback hurries, four passes defended and two forced fumbles.

Jason Buck (1985-86)

Buck dominated for the Cougars for two seasons. He was the 1985 WAC Defensive Player of the Year, a two-time All-American and the 1986 Outland Trophy winner. In 1986, he was a consensus All-American after he had 59 tackles, 17 quarterback hurries, 13 sacks and 13 tackles for loss.

For his BYU career, he had 112 tackles, 44 hurries, 25 sacks and 20 tackles for loss.

Linebacker

Backups

Larry Carr (1971-1974)

Carr had three great seasons as a Cougar linebacker. One of his most productive seasons came in 1974 when he earned first-team All-Western Athletic Conference after he registered 137 tackles, five pass break-ups, five quarterback hurries, four interceptions and four forced fumbles.

For his BYU career, he had 389 tackles, 16 pass break-ups, eight interceptions, eight tackles for loss and six forced fumbles.

Glen Redd (1976-1980)

Redd had three impressive seasons as a Cougar linebacker.He was a two-time first-team All-WAC performer and one of the best tacklers in school history. One of his best seasons came in 1980 when he was an AP honorable mention All-American after he had 148 tackles, six pass break-ups, four forced fumbles, two sacks and two tackles for loss.

For his BYU career, he had 384 tackles, 18 pass break-ups, 12 forced fumbles and 10 tackles for loss.

Shay Muirbrook (1993-96)

Muirbrook was a significant contributor each of his four years with the Cougars. He was second team All-WAC as a sophomore and a first team selection each of his last two seasons. His best year came as a senior when he was the WAC Defensive Player of the Year and the MVP of the Cotton Bowl after an epic six sack performance. That year, he had 97 tackles, nine sacks, eight tackles for loss and six pass break-ups.

For his BYU career, he recorded 345 tackles, 29 quarterback hurries, 23 tackles for loss, 19 sacks, 13 pass break-ups and six forced fumbles.

Leon White (1982-85)

White was a very impressive linebacker during his four seasons with the Cougars. He was a two-time honorable mention All-American and a first-team All-WAC performer. One of his best seasons came in 1983 when he had 87 tackles, 19 quarterback hurries, nine sacks, three tackles for loss and two forced fumbles.

For his BYU career, he had 249 tackles, 42 hurries, 20 tackles for loss, 19 pass break-ups, 17 sacks and seven forced fumbles.

Kyle Whittingham (1978-1981)

Whittingham had two really good seasons as a Cougar linebacker. His best year came in 1981 when he was first-team All-WAC, conference Co-Player of the Year and an AP honorable mention All-American. That season, he totaled 132 tackles, 16 tackles for loss, nine quarterback hurries, eight pass break-ups and seven sacks.

For his BYU career, he registered 272 tackles, 23 tackles for loss, 23 hurries, 10 sacks and six forced fumbles.

Shad Hansen (1989-1992)

Hansen was a tackling machine during his time with the Cougars. One of his best statistical seasons came in 1991 when he earned second-team All-WAC after he recorded a school record 193 tackles to go along with 13 quarterback hurries, five sacks and four tackles for loss. The next season, he was first-team All-WAC and a third-team Football News All-American after he recorded 95 tackles, including three for loss with two sacks.

For his BYU career, he registered 407 tackles, 16 quarterback hurries, 12 tackles for loss and nine sacks.

Starters

Bob Davis (1987-89)

Davis is one of the great Cougar linebackers. He was the team’s leading tackler in back-to-back seasons and a two-time first-team All-Western Athletic Conference selection. One of his best years came in 1989 when he was a AP third-team All-American after he had 137 tackles, six sacks, five quarterback hurries, four pass break-ups and three tackles for loss.

For his BYU career, he registered 349 tackles, 17 hurries, 12 sacks and seven tackles for loss.

Rod Wood (1975-78)

Wood was a huge contributor for the Cougars during his time in Provo. He was a first-team All-WAC selection and garnered All-American honors during two different seasons. One of his most productive seasons came in 1978 when he was a Churchmen’s All-American after he registered 157 tackles, six tackles for loss and three quarterback hurries.

For his BYU career. he totaled 394 tackles, 12 tackles for loss, 11 hurries, nine sacks and five forced fumbles.

Kyle Van Noy (2010-13)

Van Noy is one of the best linebackers to ever suit up for the Cougars. He was a three-time first-team All-Independent selection, the Independent Defensive Player of the Year in 2013 and a second-team All-American. His most dominant season came in 2012 when he finished with 53 tackles, including 22 for loss with 13 sacks, six forced fumbles, two interceptions and two touchdowns. His sack and tackles for loss totals placed him in the top five in the nation in both categories.

For his BYU career, he registered 226 tackles, including 62 for loss as well as 30 quarterback hurries, 26 sacks, 12 forced fumbles, seven interceptions and five touchdowns.

Rob Morris (1993, 1996-99)

Morris had a fantastic career as a linebacker for the Cougars. he was a two-time first-team all-conference performer, a two-time All-American and the 1998 WAC Defensive Player of the Year. One of his best seasons came in 1998 when he was a first-team Football News All-American after he had 147 tackles, 16 tackles for loss, 11 quarterback hurries, six sacks and four pass break-ups.

For his BYU career, he had 333 tackles, 35 tackles for loss, 21 hurries, 13 sacks and three forced fumbles.

Secondary

Backups

Chris Farasopoulos (1968-1970)

Farasopoulos was great in the secondary during his time with the Cougars. He was a two-time first-team All-WAC selection in his three years on the field. One of his best seasons came in 1969 when he had 80 tackles, 13 pass break-ups and four interceptions.

For his BYU career, he had 168 tackles, 23 pass break-ups and eight interceptions.

Omarr Morgan (1996-97)

Morgan had two really impressive campaigns in the Cougar secondary. He was a two-time first-team All-WAC selection and an honorable mention All-American. His most productive season came in 1996 when he totaled 54 tackles, 10 pass break-ups and four interceptions.

For his BYU career, he recorded 85 tackles, 18 pass break-ups and four interceptions.

Tom Holmoe (1978-82)

Holmoe was a big contributor for the Cougars during his last three seasons on the field. One of his most productive seasons came in 1982 when he was first-team All-WAC and an AP honorable mention All-American after he registered 54 tackles, five pass break-ups and three interceptions.

For his BYU career, he totaled 180 tackles, 18 pass break-ups, 13 interceptions and five tackles for loss.

 

Dana Wilgar (1973-76)

Wilgar had four very productive seasons in the Cougar secondary. He was a two-time first-team All-WAC performer and AP honorable mention All-American. One of his best seasons came in 1975 when he had 93 tackles, three interceptions, a pass break-up and a forced fumble.

For his BYU career, he totaled 280 tackles, 14 pass break-ups, eight interceptions and six forced fumbles.

Dave Atkinson (1970-73)

Atkinson was a big part of the secondary for the Cougars during each of his three years. His most productive season came in 1972 when he was first-team All-WAC after he recorded 68 tackles, nine pass break-ups, eight interceptions and two tackles for loss.

For his BYU career, he totaled 179 tackles, 22 pass break-ups, a school-record 20 interceptions and five tackles for loss.

Derwin Gray (1989-1992)

Gray had three fantastic seasons in the secondary for the Cougars. He earned All-WAC recognition his last two seasons and was a UPI honorable mention All-American. His best statistical season came in 1991 when he had 128 tackles, nine pass break-ups, three tackles for loss, three interceptions and two forced fumbles.

For his BYU career, he totaled 283 tackles, 25 pass break-ups, 14 interceptions, nine tackles for loss, four forced fumbles and two touchdowns.

Starters

Bill Schoepflin (1977-1980)

Schoepflin had three impressive seasons in the Cougar secondary. He was a two-time first-team All-WAC selection and earned honorable mention All-American status his last two years. One of his best seasons came in 1979 when he recorded 65 tackles, six pass break-ups, five interceptions and four tackles for loss.

For his BYU career, he totaled 187 tackles, 14 pass break-ups, 10 interceptions, eight tackles for loss and five forced fumbles.

Dan Hansen (1968-1972)

Hansen had an incredible career in the secondary for the Cougars. He was a two-time first-team All-WAC performer and an AP All-American. One of his best years came in 1970 when he registered 119 tackles, 10 pass break-ups and eight interceptions.

For his BYU career, he recorded 369 tackles, 29 pass break-ups, 18 interceptions and two touchdowns on interception returns.

 

Jason Coloma (1975-78)

Coloma was a really good defensive back and solid return man during his time with the Cougars. He was a two-time first-team All-WAC selection and an AP third-team All-American. His best season came in 1978 when he had 69 tackles, seven tackles for loss, four pass break-ups, two forced fumbles and two interceptions. He also returned 23 punts for 196 yards.

For his BYU career, he had 136 tackles, nine tackles for loss, six interceptions, six pass break-ups and two forced fumbles.

Kyle Morrell (1981-84)

Morrell had a great career in the secondary for the Cougars. His best year came in 1984 when he was first-team all-conference, WAC Defensive Player of the Year and an AP first-team All-American after he had 70 tackles, six pass break-ups and three interceptions.

For his BYU career, he had 232 tackles, 16 pass break-ups, eight interceptions, four tackles for loss and three sacks.

Special teams

Backup kicker/punter

Matt Payne (2000-04)

Payne had such a good career as a Cougar that he makes the all-time team as a punter and kicker. He was a three-time first-team all-conference punter and led the team in scoring and punting in three straight seasons. One of his best seasons came in 2004 when he was named first-team All-American punter by The Sporting News.

For his BYU career, he finished with 312 points and a punting average of 45.4 yards. That average is the highest in MWC history and the third highest in the NCAA since 2000.

Starting kicker

Owen Pochman (1996-2000)

Pochman was the Cougars starting kicker all four seasons in Provo and earned all-conference recognition each year. After three straight seasons a the second-team all-conference kicker he finally made the first team in 2000. That season, he was perfect on extra points and made 79.2 percent of his field goals.

For his BYU career, he finished with 333 points while hitting 97.1 percent of his extra points and 72.5 percent of his field goals.

 

Starting punter

Lee Johnson (1980-84)

Johnson had a tremendous career as a punter as well as a kicker with the Cougars. One of his best seasons came in 1984 when he led the team in scoring with 74 points while hitting 13-for-17 field goal attempts to earn All-WAC second-team honors. He was also an AP All-American honorable mention with a punting averaged of 45.5 yards.

His 47 yards per punt is still the highest average in school history.

Punt returner

James Dye (1995-96)

Dye was a dynamic play-maker during both of his seasons on the field for the Cougars. He was a two-time first-team All-WAC selection as a returner and tied the school record with four punt return touchdowns. In 1995, he was WAC special teams player of the year after he led the nation with 21.9 yards per punt return.

For his BYU career, he has a school record 19.8 yards per punt return. He also averaged 25.7 on 23 kick returns with another touchdown.

Vai Sikahema (1980-81, 1983-85)

as well as being a solid running back, Sikahema was outstanding in the return game. His best year came in 1984 when he was an honorable mention All-WAC performer after he had 51 punt returns for 472 yards and two touchdowns. He added 15 kick returns for 376 yards. A year later, he was second-team All-WAC with 54 punt returns for 441 yards and another score.

For his career, he holds the BYU records for punt returns in a career (153) and yards (1,312). He was inducted into the BYU hall of fame in 2002.

Golden Richards (1970-71)

Although he didn’t finish his college career in a Cougar uniform, Richards was a great player during his time in Provo. His best year came in 1971 when he was first-team all conference after he took four punts back for touchdowns, including two in one game against North Texas. His 624 punt-return yards is still the most in a single season in school history.

Kick returner

Paul Allen (1959-61)

Allen was a special teams legend and a solid running back during his time with the Cougars. His best year came in 1961 when he returned three kicks for touchdowns and set an NCAA record in average yards per return. His 40.1 kick return average in 1961 is still the top mark in NCAA history today.

Chris Farasopoulos (1968-1970)

Farasopoulos was fantastic as a punt and kick returner. He had two of the top 10 kick return seasons in school history. One of his best years came in 1969 when he led the nation in punt returns and set the NCAA record for combined punt and kick return yards for a season with 1,075.

His 27.27 yards per kick return is still the top mark in BYU history.