Ranking the best tight ends in University of Utah history

The Utes have never been known for using the tight end as a huge part of the offense, but they have produced some very impressive players none the less. Some were excellent as blockers while others really knew how to get it done in as receivers. The best of the best were able to do both.

Utah has had a number of all-conference selections from its time in the Skyline, Western Athletic and the Mountain West.

Here are my rankings of the best tight ends in University of Utah history.

Note: These rankings are based only on what each player did during his time as with the Utes.

H.M. Dallin Rogers (2007, 2010-12)

Even though he played at the same time as a couple really solid tight ends, Rogers still made his presence felt on the field for the Utes. His best season came in 2011 when he finished third on the team with 22 catches for 160 yards and two touchdowns.

For his Utah career, he had 44 receptions for 398 yards and five touchdowns.

H.M. Fred Hobbs (1973-75)

Although he didnt put up huge numbers during his time with the Utes, Hobbs was able to find the end zone every year. His most productive season came in 1975 when he caught 18 passes for 223 yards and a touchdown.

For his Utah career, he had 32 catches for 442 yards and three touchdowns.

H.M. Gordon Kurz (1974, 1977-78)

While Kurz only had one really productive season, it was good enough to deserve some mention. His best year came in 1977 when he caught 22 passes for 312 yards and two touchdowns. Those numbers placed him third on the team in catches and receiving yards as well as second in receiving touchdowns.

For his Utah career, he had 25 receptions for 343 yards and two touchdowns.

H.M. Rick Tucker (1994-95)

Tucker made solid contributions during his two years on the field with the Utes. His best year came in 1994 when he had 14 catches for 164 yards and four touchdowns.

For his Utah career, he caught 21 passes for 437 yards and four scores.

H.M. Terry Baker (1963-66)

Baker was a very important part of the passing game under coaches Ray Nagal and Mike Giddings. His best season came in 1966 when he finished with 17 catches for 195 yards and two touchdowns. Those numbers were good enough to lead the team in catches and receiving yards.

For his Utah career, he caught 35 passes for 395 yards and three touchdowns.

15. Andy Parker (1979-1983)

Parker was a really productive player by the time he finished with the Utes. His best season came in 1983 when he finished third on the team with 33 catches for 395 yards and two touchdowns.

For his Utah career, he caught 42 passes for 518 yards and two touchdowns.

14. Westlee Tonga (2010-14)

Tonga made a big impact on the offense during his time with the Utes. His best season came in 2014 when he had 30 receptions for 391 yards and four touchdowns. Those numbers were good enough to place him fourth ob the team in receptions and receiving yards while tying for first in touchdown catches.

For his Utah career, he caught 37 passes for 470 yards and five touchdowns.

13. Ray Elgaard (1981-82)

Elgaard put up some nice numbers during his two years with the Utes. One of his best showings came In 1981 when he caught 18 passes for 265 yards and three touchdowns.

For his Utah career, he had 28 receptions for 467 yards and six touchdowns.

12. Bob Trumpy (1966)

Trumpy played just one season with the Utes after leaving Illinois and made some nice contributions. In 1966, he caught nine passes for 159 yards and two touchdowns. Those numbers placed him third on the team in receiving yards while tying for second in receiving touchdowns.

11. Mike Anglesey (1987-1990)

Anglesey had two very solid seasons during his time on the hill. His most productive season came in 1989 when he finished with 46 receptions for 566 yards and four touchdowns. Those numbers were good enough to place him in the top 10 in the WAC in receptions.

For his Utah career, he caught 82 passes for 1,085 yards and nine touchdowns.

10. Jake Murphy (2011-13)

Murphy was a solid contributor for three seasons before he left school early to try his hand at the NFL. One of his best years came as a junior in 2013 when he caught 25 passes for 417 yards and five touchdowns.

For his Utah career, he had 63 receptions for 830 yards and 10 touchdowns.

9. Steve Folsom (1978-1980)

Folsom was a big part of the offense from the moment he got on the field for the Utes after transferring from Long Beach State. His most productive year came in 1978 when he had 23 catches for 342 yards and five touchdowns. Those numbers placed him second in the WAC in receiving touchdowns and sixth in yards-per-reception (14.9).

For his Utah career, he caught 56 passes for 853 yards and eight touchdowns.

8. Ben Moa (2002-03)

Moa had two solid seasons during his time on the hill. His best year came in 2003 when he earned first-team all-MWC honors after he caught 26 passes for 366 yards and three touchdowns to go along with 31 carries for 151 yards and three more scores.

For his Utah career, he had 40 receptions for 492 yards and three touchdowns with 151 yards and three scores in the running game.

7. Curt Jones (1985-88)

Jones had two really productive seasons during his four years at Utah. His best season came in 1987 when he finished with 56 receptions for 569 yards and six touchdowns. Those numbers placed him fourth in the conference in touchdown receptions and sixth in catches.

For his Utah career, he caught 120 passes for 1,275 yards and 13 scores.

6. Willie Armstead (1972-74)

Armstead had three really solid seasons during his time with the Utes while playing both wide receiver and tight end, according to Sports-reference.com. One of his most productive years came in 1974 when he had 34 catches for 520 yards and four touchdowns.

For his Utah career, he caught 83 passes for 1,471 yards and 13 touchdowns.

5. Mike Butera (1965-66)

Butera had one amazing season during his two years on the field for the Utes. That year came in 1965 when he led the Utes with 29 receptions for 469 yards and four touchdowns to earn first-team all-WAC tight end.

For his Utah career, he had 39 receptions for 582 yards and four touchdowns.

4. Craig McEwen (1985-86)

McEwen had two very impressive seasons with the Utes. His best year came in 1986 when he had 64 catches for 721 yards and seven touchdowns. Those numbers placed him second in the WAC in receptions, third in receiving touchdowns and fourth in yards.

For his Utah career, he caught 111 passes for 1,199 yards and nine touchdowns.

3. Marv Fleming (1960-62)

Fleming was very productive for the Utes during all three years on the field. His best statistical season came in 1960 when he had nine catches for a team-leading 237 yards and two touchdowns. A year later, he earned first-team all-Skyline after he caught 15 passes for 193 yards and two scores.

For his Utah career, he had 35 receptions for 598 yards and six touchdowns.

2. Dale Nosworthy (1968-1970)

While his stats aren’t big by today’s standards, Nosworthy was a very productive tight end during his time with the Utes. His most productive season came in 1970 when he finished with 23 catches for 309 yards and three touchdowns to earn first-team all-WAC honors for the second straight year. In fact, he is the only two-time first-team all-conference tight end in school history.

For his Utah career, he had 49 receptions for 659 yards and four touchdowns.

1. Dennis Smith (1986-89)

Smith was part of some of the most dominant offensive units in school history. While he earned all-WAC first-team honors, he best season came in 1989. That year, he caught 73 passes for 1,091 yards and 18 touchdowns. Those numbers placed him sixth in the nation in receptions and yards as well as second in receiving touchdowns.

For his Utah career, he had 156 catches for 2,168 yards and 24 touchdowns.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s