It’s not about when you draft, it’s who you draft. While it’s nice to have a top three, top five or top 10 pick, It doesn’t mean you cant get a quality player if your pick is later than that. All you have to do is look at the 2013 draft to prove my point. While the top of the draft was a little bit of a mess, there were still plenty of impactful players available at the backend of the first round. The biggest steal of the group was Utah Jazz center Rudy Gobert. Gobert was taken with the 27th pick by the Denver Nuggets before he was traded to the Jazz, and is now widely considered one of the best players in the whole draft.

But Gobert’s story is not unique. Plenty of great NBA players had to wait to hear their name called before going on to remarkable careers.

This list is my ranking of the best of those players – guys who were drafted outside the top 10 who went on to do special things in the NBA.

All statistical, award and draft information from Basketball-reference.com.

H.M. Jimmy Butler

Butler was taken with the 30th overall pick in the 2011 draft. He has played four seasons with the Bulls and is one of the best young players in the game today. His most productive season came in 2014-15 when he made the all-star game, was second-team all-defense and won the most improved player. That season, he averaged 20 points on 46.2 percent shooting from the floor with 5.8 rebounds, 3.3 assists and 1.8 steals in 65 games.

To this point in his career, he is averaging 11.7 points, 4.3 rebounds, 2.0 assists and 1.3 steals in 256 games (152 starts).

H.M. Paul Millsap

Millsap was selected with the 17th pick of the second round (47th overall) by the Utah Jazz in the 2006 draft. He has played nine seasons for the Jazz and the Atlanta Hawks and is a two-time all-star. His most productive season came with the Hawks in 2013-14 when he averaged a career-high 17.9 points, 8.5 rebounds, 3.1 assists, 1.7 steals and 1.1 blocks in 74 games.

To this point in his career, he is averaging 13.5 points on 50.3 percent shooting with 7.3 rebounds, 2. 0 assists, 1.3 steals and 1.0 blocks in 687 games (411 starts).

H.M. Kawhi Leonard

Leonard was taken with the 15th overall pick by the Indiana Pacers in the 2011 draft and traded to the San Antonio Spurs. He has played four seasons for the Spurs and has already earned second-team all-defense, first-team all-defense, defensive player of the year and finals MVP. His most productive season came in 2014-15 when he averaged 16.5 points, 7.2 rebounds, 2.5 assists and 2.3 steals in 64 games.

To this point in his career, he is averaging 12.3 points on 49.6 percent shooting with 6.1 rebounds, 1.8 assists and 1.8 steals in 252 games (225 starts).

H.M. Marc Gasol

Gasol was selected with 18th pick in the second round (48th overall) by the Los Angeles Lakers in the 2007 draft. He was traded to the Memphis Grizzlies before ever playing a game and has spent his seven-year career in Memphis. During that time, he has made two all-star games, earned all-NBA first-team and second-team and won defensive player of the year. His most productive season came in 2014-14 when he averaged 17.4 points, 7.8 rebounds, 3.8 assists and 1.6 blocks in 81 games.

To this point in his career, he has averaged 14.1 points on 50.9 percent shooting with 7.9 rebounds, 3.0 assists and 1.6 blocks in 517 games (510 starts).

H.M. Zach Randolph

Randolph was taken with the 19th overall pick by the Portland Trail Blazers in the 2001 draft. He has played 14 seasons for the Trail Blazers, New York Knicks, Los Angeles Clippers and the Memphis Grizzlies. He has made two all-star game appearances, won most improved player and earned all-NBA third-team. One of his most productive seasons came with the Trail Blazers in 2006-07 when he averaged 23.6 points, 10.1 rebounds and 2.2 assists in 68 games.

So far in his career, he is averaging 17.1 points on 47.3 percent shooting with 9.5 rebounds and 1.8 assists in 916 games (767 starts).

H.M. Klay Thompson

Thompson was selected with the 11th overall pick in the 2001 draft by the Golden State Warriors. He has played four years with Golden State and has already made an all-star game and been named all-NBA third-team. His most productive season came in 2014-15 when he averaged 21.7 points on 43.9 percent shooting from beyond the arc. He added 3.6 rebounds, 3.3 assists and 1.3 steals in 77 games.

So far in his career, he is averaging 17.5 points on 44.3 percent shooting with 3.1 rebounds, 2.3 assists and 1.0 steals in 306 games (269 starts).

25. Jermaine O’Neal

O’Neal was taken with the 17th overall pick by the Portland Trail Blazers in the 1996 draft. He played 18 seasons for the Trail Blazers, Indiana Pacers, Toronto Raptors, Miami Heat Boston Celtics, Phoenix Suns and the Golden State Warriors. The best stretch of his career came with the Pacers where he made six straight all-star games and made the all-NBA second or third-team three times. One of his best seasons came in 2002-03 when he averaged 20.8 points, 10.3 rebounds, 2.3 blocks and 2.0 assists in 77 games.

For his career, he averaged 13.2 points, 7.2 rebounds, 1.8 blocks and 1.4 rebounds in 1,011 games (697 starts).

24. Larry Nance

Nance was selected with the 20th overall pick by the Phoenix Suns in the 1981 draft. He played 13 seasons for the Suns and the Cleveland Cavaliers. He was a three-time all-star and also made first or second-team all-defense three times. One of his best seasons came with the Suns in 1986-87 when he averaged a career-high 22.5 points on 55.1 percent shooting from the floor. He added 8.7 rebounds, 3.4 assists, 2.1 blocks and 1.2 steals in 69 games.

For his career, he averaged 17.1 points on 54.6 percent shooting with 8.0 rebounds, 2.6 assists and 2.2 blocks in 920 games (795 starts).

23. Jamaal Wilkes

Wilkes was taken with the 11th overall pick by the Golden State Warriors in the 1974 draft. He played 12 seasons for the Warriors, Los Angeles Lakers and the Los Angeles Clippers. He was a three-time all-star, made second-team all-defense twice and won the rookie of the year in 1974-75. One of his best seasons came with the Lakers in 1980-81 when he averaged 22.6 points on 52.6 percent shooting from the floor. He added 5.4 rebounds, 2.9 assists and 1.5 steals in 81 games.

For his career, he averaged 17.7 points on 49.9 percent shooting with 6.2 rebounds, 2.5 assists and 1.3 steals in 828 games. He was inducted in the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame in 2012.

22. Calvin Murphy

Murphy was selected with the first pick in the second round (18th overall) by the San Diego Rockets in the 1970 draft. He played his entire 13-year career with the San Diego/Houston Rockets and made an all-star game. One of his best seasons came in 1973-74 when he averaged 20.4 points on 52.2 percent shooting from the field. He added 7.4 assists, 2.3 rebounds and 1.9 steals in 81 games.

For his career, he averaged 17.9 points on 48.2 percent shooting with 4.4 assists, 2.1 rebounds and 1.5 steals in 1,002 games. He was inducted in the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame in 1993.

21. Manu Ginobili

Ginobili was selected with the 28th pick in the second round (57th overall) by the San Antonio Spurs in the 1999 draft. He has played 13 seasons with the Spurs and has been a part of four championship teams. He has made two all-star game appearances, earned third-team all-NBA twice and won the sixth man of the year in 2007-08. One of his best seasons came in 2007-08 when he averaged 19.5 points, 4.8 rebounds, 4.5 assists and 1.5 steals in 74 games.

So far in his career, he is averaging 14.3 points, 4.0 assists, 3.8 rebounds and 1.4 steals in 865 games (349 starts).

20. Shawn Kemp

Kemp was taken with the 17th overall pick in the 1989 draft by the Seattle SuperSonics. He played 14 seasons with the Sonics, Cleveland Cavaliers, Portland Trail Blazers and the Orlando Magic. He made six all-star games, including five as a starter and made all-NBA second-team three years in a row. One of his best seasons came with Seattle in 1995-96 when he averaged 19.6 points on 56.1 percent shooting from the floor. He added 11.4 rebounds, 2.2 assists, 1.6 blocks and 1.2 steals in 79 games.

For his career, he averaged 14.6 points, 8.4 rebounds, 1.6 assists, 1.2 blocks and 1.1 steals in 1,051 games (728 starts).

19. Richie Guerin

Guerin was taken with the eighth pick in the second round (17th overall) by the New York Knicks in the 1954 draft. He played 13 seasons with the Knicks and the St. Louis/Atlanta Hawks. The best stretch of his career came with the Knicks where he made six straight all-star games and made all-NBA second-team three times. One of his best seasons came in New York in 1961-62 when he averaged 29.5 points, 6.9 assists and 6.4 rebounds in 78 games.

For his career, he averaged 17.3 points, 5.0 rebounds and 5.0 assists in 848 games. He was inducted in the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame in 2013.

18. Chet Walker

Walker was selected by the Syracuse Nationals with the fifth pick in the second round (12th overall) of the 1962 draft. He played 13 seasons with the Nationals/Philadelphia 76ers and the Chicago Bulls and was a seven-time all-star. One of his most productive seasons came with the Bulls in 1971-72 when he averaged 22 points on 50.5 percent shooting from the floor to go along with 6.1 rebounds and 2.3 assists.

For his career, he averaged 18.2 points on 47 percent shooting with 7.1 rebounds and 2.1 assists in 1,032 games. He was inducted in to the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame in 2012.

17. Harry Gallatin

Gallatin was taken with the 40th pick by the New York Knicks in the 1948 BAA draft. He played 10 seasons with the Knicks and the Detroit Pistons. He was a seven-time all-star and earned first or second-team all-NBA twice. One of his best seasons came in New York in 1953-54 when he averaged 13.2 points, 15.3 rebounds and 2.1 assists in 72 games.

For his career, he averaged 13 points, 11.9 rebounds and 1.8 assists in 682 games. He got his call to the hall of fame in 1991.

16. Tim Hardaway

Hardaway was taken with the 14th overall pick by the Golden State Warriors in the 1989 draft. He played for 13 seasons with the Warriors, Miami Heat, Dallas Mavericks, Denver Nuggets and the Indiana Pacers. He made five all-star games appearances and earned all-NBA first, second or third-team five times. One of his best seasons came in 1990-91 when he averaged 22.9 points on 47.6 percent shooting from the floor to go along with 9.7 assists, 4.0 rebounds and 2.6 steals in 82 games.

For his career, he averaged 17.7 points, 8.2 assists, 3.3 rebounds and 1.6 steals in 867 games (770 starts).

15. Joe Dumars

Dumars was taken with the 18th overall pick by the Detroit Pistons in the 1985 draft. He spent his entire 14-year career with the Pistons and was a huge piece of two championship teams. He made six all-star game appearances, earned first-team all-defense four times and was second or third-team all-NBA three times. One of his best seasons came in 1992-93 when he averaged 23.5 points, 4.0 assists, 1.9 rebounds and 1.0 steals in 77 games.

For his career, he averaged 16.1 points on 46 percent shooting with 4.5 assists and 2.2 rebounds in 1,018 games (944 starts. He was inducted in the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame in 2006.

14. Dennis Rodman

Rodman was selected with the third pick of the second round (27th overall) by the Detroit Pistons in the 1986 draft. He played 14 seasons for the Pistons, San Antonio Spurs, Chicago Bulls, Los Angeles Lakers and the Dallas Mavericks and was one of the best rebounders of his generation. He made two all-star games, won defensive player of the year twice, was named third-team all-NBA twice, won five championships, led the league in rebounding seven times and was first or second-team all-defense eight times. One of his best seasons came in 1991-92 when he averaged 9.8 points on 53.9 percent shooting with 18.7 rebounds and 2.3 assists in 82 games.

For his career, he averaged 7.3 points on 52.1 percent shooting with 13.1 rebounds and 1.8 assists in 911 games (573 starts). He was inducted in the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame in 2011.

13. Dennis Johnson

Johnson was selected with the 12th pick in the second round (29th overall) by the Seattle SuperSonics in the 1976 draft. He played 14 seasons for the Sonics, Phoenix Suns and the Boston Celtics. He was a five-time all-star, won three championships, was first or second-team all-defense nine times, named first or second-team all-NBA twice and was the 1978-79 finals MVP. One of his best seasons came with the Suns in 1981-82 when he averaged 19.5 points, 5.1 rebounds, 4.6 assists and 1.3 steals in 80 games.

For his career, he averaged 14.1 points, 5.0 assists, 3.9 rebounds and 1.3 steals in 1,100 games. He was inducted in the basketball hall of fame in 2010.

12. Cliff Hagan

Hagan was taken in the third round (24th pick) of the 1953 draft by the Boston Celtics, but never played a game for the Celtics. He played 13 seasons in the NBA and ABA for the St. Louis Hawks and the Dallas Chaparrals. He was a six-time all-star who earned second-team all-NBA honors twice. ONe of his best seasons came with the Hawks in 1959-1960 when he averaged 24.8 points on 46.4 percent shooting to go along with 10.7 rebounds and 4.0 assists in 75 games.

For his career, he averaged 17.7 points, 6.6 rebounds and 3.2 assists in 839 games. He was inducted in the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame in 1978.

11. Reggie Miller

Miller was taken with the 11th overall pick by the Indiana Pacers in the 1987 draft. He spent his entire 18-year career with the Pacers and was one of the premier shooters in league history. He made five all-star game, earned third-team all-NBA three times and is 18th all-time in points scored in the NBA. One of his best seasons came in 1989-1990 when he averaged 24.6 points on 51.4 percent shooting to go along with 3.8 assists, 3.6 rebounds and 1.3 steals.

For his career, he averaged 18.2 points, 3.0 rebounds, 3.0 assists and 1.1 steals in 1,389 games (1,304 starts). He was inducted in the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame in 2012.

10. Tony Parker

Parker was taken with the 28th overall pick by the San Antonio Spurs in the 2001 draft. He has spent his entire 14-year career with the Spurs. He has made six all-star games, won four championship rings, been named second or third-team all-NBA four times and won the finals MVP in 2006-07. One of his best seasons came in 2008-09 when he averaged 22 points on 50.6 percent shooting to go along with 6.9 assists and 3.1 rebounds in 72 games.

So far in his career, he is averaging 16.9 points on 49.4 percent shooting with 5.9 assists and 2.9 rebounds in 1,008 games (995 starts).

9. Alex English

English was taken with the sixth pick of the second round (23rd overall) by the Milwaukee Bucks in the 1976 draft. He played 15 seasons in the NBA for the Bucks, Indiana Pacers, Denver Nuggets and Dallas Mavericks and was an elite scorer. He made eight all-star games and earned second-team all-NBA three times. One of his best seasons came in 1982-82 when he averaged a league-leading 28.4 points to go along with 7.3 rebounds, 4.8 assists, 1.5 blocks and 1.4 steals in 82 games.

For his career, he averaged 21.5 points on 50.7 percent shooting with 5.5 rebounds and 3.6 assists in 1,193 games (753 starts). He was inducted in the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame in 1997.

8. Tiny Archibald

Archibald was selected with the second pick of the second round (19th overall) by the Cincinnati Royals in the 1970 draft. He played 13 seasons for the Royals/Kansas City-Omaha/Kansas City Kings, New York Knicks, Boston Celtics and the Milwaukee Bucks. He was a six-time all-star, earned first or second-team all-NBA five times and won a championship with the 1981 Celtics. One of his best seasons came with the Kings in 1972-73 when he averaged a league-leading 34 points, 11.4 assists and 2.8 rebounds in 80 games.

For his career, he averaged 18.8 points, 7.4 assists, 2.3 rebounds and 1.1 steals in 876 games. He was inducted in the basketball hall of fame in 1991.

7. Hal Greer

Greer was selected with the sixth pick in the second round (13th overall) by the Syracuse Nationals in the 1958 draft. He spent his entire 15-year career with the Nationals/Philadelphia 76ers. He was a 10-time all-star, earned second-team all-NBA seven times and was named one of the NBA’s 50 greatest players. One of his best seasons came in 1967-68 when he averaged 24.1 points, 5.4 rebounds and 4.5 assists in 82 games.

For his career, he averaged 19.2 points, 5.0 rebounds and 4.0 assists in 1,122 games. He was inducted in the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame in 1982.

6. Bill Sharman

Sharman was taken in the second round (17th overall) by the Washington Capitols in the 1950 draft. He played 11 seasons for the Capitols and the Boston Celtics where he was one of the best players in the early days of the NBA. He made eight all-star games, earned first or second-team all-NBA seven times, won four championships and was named one of the 50 greatest players in NBA history. One of his best seasons came in 1955-56 when he averaged 19.9 points, 4.7 assists and 3.6 rebounds in 72 games.

For his career, he averaged 17.8 points, 3.9 rebounds and 3.0 assists in 711 games. He was inducted in the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame in 1976.

5. Steve Nash

Nash was selected with the 15th overall pick by the Phoenix Suns in the 1996 draft. He played 18 seasons for the Suns, Dallas Mavericks and the Los Angeles Lakers. He made eight all-star teams, earned first, second or third-team all-NBA seven times, led the league in assists per game five times and won two MVPs. One of his best seasons came with Phoenix in 2005-06 when he averaged 18.8 points on 51.2 percent shooting from the floor. He added 10.5 assists and 4.2 rebounds in 79 games.

For his career, he averaged 14.3 points, 8.5 assists and 3.0 rebounds in 1,217 games (1,053 starts).

4. Clyde Drexler

Drexler was taken with the 14th overall pick by the Portland Trail Blazers in the 1983 draft. He played 15 seasons for the Trail Blazers and the Houston Rockets. He made 10 all-star teams, earned first, second or third-team all-NBA five times and was named one of the 50 greatest players in NBA history. One of his best seasons came in Portland in 1988-89 when he averaged 27.2 points on 49.6 percent shooting from the floor. He added 7.9 rebounds, 5.8 assists and 2.7 steals in 78 games.

For his career, he averaged 20.4 points, 6.1 rebounds, 5.6 assists and 2.0 steals in 1,086 games (950 starts). He was inducted in the basketball hall of fame in 2004.

3. John Stockton

Stockton was selected by the Utah Jazz with the 16th overall pick in the 1984 draft. He played his entire 19-year career with the Jazz and is the league’s all-time leader in assists and steals. He earned first, second or third-team all-NBA 11 times, made 10 all-star games, led the league in assists per game nine straight years, was second team all-defense five times and was named one of the 50 best players in NBA history. One of his best statistical seasons came in 1987-88 when he averaged 14.7 points on 57.4 percent shooting from the floor. He added 13.8 assists, 3.0 steals and 2.9 rebounds in 82 games.

For his career, he averaged 13.1 points, 10.5 assists, 2.7 rebounds and 2.2 steals in 1,504 games (1,300 starts). He was inducted in the basketball hall of fame in 2009.

2. Karl Malone

Malone was taken with the 13th overall pick by the Utah Jazz in the 1985 draft. He played 19 seasons for the Jazz and the Los Angeles Lakers and finished his career as the second leading scorer in league history. He made 14 all-star games, was first, second or third-team all-NBA 14 times, finished in the top five in scoring 13 times, made first or second-team all-defense four times, won two MVP trophies and was named one of the 50 greatest players in NBA history. One of his best seasons came in 1990-91 when he averaged 29 points on 52.7 percent shooting from the floor. He added 11.8 rebounds, 3.3 assists, 1.1 steals and 1.0 blocks in 82 games.

For his career, he averaged 25 points on 51.6 percent shooting with 10.1 rebounds, 3.6 assists and 1.4 steals in 1,476 games, (1,471 starts). He was inducted in the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame in 2010.

1. Kobe Bryant

Bryant was taken with the 13th overall pick by the Charlotte Hornets in the 1996 draft and then traded to the Los Angeles Lakers. He has played his entire 19-year career in Los Angeles and is one of the greatest scorers the league has ever seen. He has made 17 all-star games, named first, second, or third-team all-NBA 15 times, earned first or second-team all-defense 12 times, won five championship as well as securing four all-star game MVPs, two finals MVPs and the league MVP in 2007-08. One of his best years came in 2005-06 when he averaged 35.4 points, 5.3 rebounds, 4.5 assists and 1.8 steals in 80 games.

So far in his career, he is averaging 25.4 points, 5.3 rebounds, 4.8 assists and 1.5 steals in 1,280 games (1,132 starts).

While LeBron James is the best player in the NBA today and one of the best in league history, not everything he does is legendary or epic. Yet for some reason everybody throws those terms around on a nightly basis when he is on the floor. The same words were on full display on Sunday night when he had 37 points, 18 rebounds and 13 assists in a three-point win over the Atlanta Hawks.

Yes, those numbers are huge. Yes, he played a massive role in the Cavaliers win. No, it wasn’t a legendary or epic performance. While he has been really good, he hasn’t been himself. Especially in these playoffs, and Sunday was more proof of that.

James has played 171 playoff games over the course of ten seasons. In those games, he is averaging 28 points on 47.7 percent shooting from the floor, including 31.9 percent from 3-point range and 75.6 percent from the free-throw line. He also contributes 8.6 rebounds, 6.6 assists and 1.7 steals with 3.5 turnovers in 42.4 minutes a game.

This year those numbers are different. While his rebounding and assist numbers have been very impressive, his shooting and decision-making have taken a big hit. He is shooting just 42.2 percent from the floor (third worst of his playoff career), including just 16.1 percent from three (by far the worst of his career). It’s not like he hasn’t been shooting the three either. He is 10-for-62 from distance so far. That leaves him with a career-low effective field goal percentage of 43.9. And it’s not like that is limiting him from letting it fly. He is averaging a career-high of 25.2 shots per game. His is also averaging 4.6 turnovers a game (the second highest of his career).

That leads us to his “EPIC” game from Sunday night. He shot 37.8 percent from the floor on 37 attempts. That is his fourth worst shooting night in these playoffs. His 37 attempts were his most in any NBA game of his career (regular season or playoffs). His 23 missed shots were his most in these or another other playoffs.In fact, it ties the most misses he has ever had in any NBA game (he was 11-for-34 in a six-point win over the Minnesota Timberwolves on February 8th, 2006, and 12-for-35 in a three-point loss to the Detroit Pistons on April 17th, 2005). His ball handling wasn’t on point either. His six turnovers were tied for third most in this playoff run and just the 28th time in his playoff career that he had at least that many.

Don’t get me wrong, I’m not saying it was his worst playoff performance or anything of the sort. In fact, It’s far from it! (that game came in Boston in May of 2008 when he had 12 points, nine rebounds and nine assists, but shot just 2-for-18 from the floor and had 10 turnovers). I just don’t throw around the terms legendary or epic very often. There are reserved for better than what we saw from LeBron on Sunday.

All statistical information from Basketball-reference.com.

While the BYU signal callers get most of the love in national circles, BYU has had more than its fair share of impressive running backs. Some where great rushers or pass catchers while others were great blockers who had a nose for the end zone. The best of the best could do it all and helped make the Cougars successful.

Here is my list of the best Cougar running backs in school history.

Stats and national rankings from Sports-reference.com. All-conference and All-American information from BYUCougars.com.

H.M. Scott Pettis (1979-1982)

After starting his career as a walk-on, Pettis made a huge impact on some very good BYU teams. His best season came as a junior in 1981 when he ran for 499 yards and five touchdowns on 94 carries while adding 48 receptions for 490 yards and four more scores.

For his BYU career, he had 149 carries for 899 yards and 10 touchdowns to go along with 86 catches for 807 yards and five more scores.

H.M. Mark Atuaia (1991, 1994-96)

While he was never the biggest weapon on the team, Atuaia was always a huge part of the Cougars offensive success. His most productive season came as a senior in 1996 when he rushed for 365 yards and four touchdowns, He also added 28 catches for 304 yards and two more scores.

For his BYU career, he carried the ball 301 times for 1,247 yards and 11 touchdowns to go along with 68 receptions for 668 yards and four scores.

H.M. Marcus Whalen (2000-03)

While he didn’t make a huge statistical impact during all his years at BYU, Whalen had one very productive year. That came as a sophomore in 2002 when he led the Cougars with 918 yards and six touchdowns on the ground. He also managed 27 receptions for 203 yards. His 1,121 yards from scrimmage were good enough for sixth place in the MWC that season.

For his BYU career, he carried the ball 264 times for 1,266 yards and eight touchdowns to go along with 36 catches for 264 yards.

H.M. Kip Jackson (1968-1970)

Like Whalen, Jackson only had one really big year for the Cougars, but it was good enough to deserve a mention. His best season came as a junior in 1969 when he led the Cougars with 791 rushing yards on 209 carries and scored two touchdowns. He added 25 catches for 261 yards and two more scores.

For his BYU career, he had 312 carries for 1,180 yards and seven touchdowns to go along with 42 receptions for 408 yards and three scores.

H.M. Kelly Smith (1980, 1983-85)

While he spent his time at BYU playing all over the field, he did enough during his time as a running back to deserve recognition. His best season came as a junior in 1984 when he averaged 6.9 yards per carry on his way to 347 yards and six touchdowns. He also caught 46 passes for 598 yards and six more scores. His 12 touchdowns were good enough for third in the WAC.

For his BYU career, he rushed for 408 yards and six touchdowns to go along with 95 receptions for 1,128 yards and eight scores.

H.M. Eddie Stinnett (1982-83)

While he never got to carry the load for the BYU ground game during his two seasons, he sure knew what to do when he got the ball. His most productive season came as a senior in 1983 when he averaged 8.6 yards per carry on his way to 475 rushing yards and eight touchdowns. He was also a huge threat in the passing game with 50 receptions for 458 yards and another score.

For his BYU career, he carried the ball 101 times for 742 yards and nine touchdowns to go along with 64 catches for 585 yards and two more scores.

H.M. Kalin Hall (1992-93)

Splitting time with one of the best backs in school history limited Hall’s production, but he still made a huge impression during his two seasons in Provo. As a junior in 1993, he rushed for 742 yards and four touchdowns. A year later he finished sixth in the WAC with nine rushing scores.

For his BYU career, he carried the ball 251 times for 1,309 yards and 13 touchdowns to go along with 31 receptions for 338  yards and two scores.

25. Waymon Hamilton (1980-1983)

While the Cougars had plenty of options during his time at BYU, Hamilton was the one who found the end zone the most. His best season came as a sophomore in 1981 when Led the WAC in touchdowns and rushing touchdowns. That season he carried the ball 96 times for 394 yards and 14 touchdowns to go along with 32 receptions for 387 yards and two more scores.

For his BYU career, he had 218 carries for 1,064 yards and 29 touchdowns. He added 70 receptions for 819 yards and three scores.

24. J.J. Di Luigi (2007-2011)

While the production never really matched the hype he received coming out of high school, Di Luigi was a very good back for the Cougars. His best season came as a junior in 2010 when he earned second-team all-MWC. That season, he rushed for 917 yards and eight touchdowns while catches 45 passes for 443 yards and another score.

For his BYU career, he carried the ball 352 times for 1,797 yards and 14 touchdowns to go along with 96 catches for 990 yards and five more scores.

23. Manase Tonga (2005-07, 2009)

Tonga never put up huge stats, but he made a big difference for the Cougars in all aspects of the game. He was a great blocker who could make plays in the running and passing game. His most productive season came as a junior in 2007 when he carried the ball 88 times for 305 yards and eight touchdowns while chipping in with 27 receptions for 248 yards.

For his BYU career, he had 178 carries for 678 yards and 16 touchdowns to go along with 85 receptions for 799 yards and six more scores.

22. Scott Phillips (1977-1980)

While he never had a monster year in the ground game, Phillips made nice contributions every season he was on the field for the Cougars. His most productive year came as a senior in 1980 when he carried the ball 50 times for 330 yards while making 60 catches for 689 yards and seven touchdowns.

For his BYU career, he had 212 carries for 1,157 yards and seven touchdowns to go along with 131 receptions for 1,551 yards and 11 scores.

21. Fred Whittingham (1984, 1987-89)

Whittingham was another back who could get it done on the ground and as a receiver. His most productive season came as a senior in 1989 when he carried the ball 109 times for 582 yards and eight touchdowns. He also chipped in with 34 catches for 465 yards and three more scores.

For his BYU career, he had 351 carries for 1,580 yards and 14 touchdowns to go along with 97 receptions for 1,015 yards and five scores.

20. Hema Heimuli (1991-95)

While he was on the roster with Kalin Hall and Jamal Willis, Heimuli still provided the Cougars with two big seasons. His most productive year came as a junior in 1994 when he had 126 carries for 552 yards and four touchdowns. He added 40 receptions for 456 yards and six more scores.

For his BYU career, he carried the ball 329 times for 1,426 yards and 11 touchdowns to go along with 115 catches for 1,272 yards and 10 scores.

19. Peter Tuipulotu (1987-1991)

While the Cougars had plenty of talented backs on the roster during his time at BYU, Tuipulotu led the rushing attack for two straight seasons. He had a very good season in 1990 when he finished fifth in the nation with 6.5 yards per carry. That year, he also finished third in the WAC with nine rushing touchdowns. A year later, he had 125 carries for  619 yards and six touchdowns to go along with 41 receptions for 587 yards and two more scores.

For his BYU career, he carried the ball 277 times for 1,528 yards and 17 touchdowns. He also added 82 catches for 965 yards and five scores.

18. Todd Christensen (1974-77)

While he never got full-time touches in the running game, Christensen was fantastic catching the ball out of the backfield. One of his most productive seasons came as a senior in 1977 when he earned first-team All-WAC. That year, he had 79 carries for 290 yards and three touchdowns while making 50 receptions for 603 yards and five more scores.

For his BYU career, he carried the ball 276 times for 1,072 yards and eight touchdowns to go along with 158 catches for 1,619 yards and 13 scores.

17. Homer Jones (1979-1980)

Even though his raw numbers look like much, Jones did some impressive things during his two years with the Cougars. His best season came as a junior in 1979 when he finished seventh in the nation with 7.3 yards per carry and led the WAC in receptions. That season, he carried the ball 75 times for 546 yards and seven touchdowns while catching 46 passes for 404 yards and four more scores to earn first-team all-WAC.

For his BYU career, he had 107 carries for 709 yards and nine touchdowns to go along with 78 receptions for 795 yards and six scores.

16. Eric Lane (1979-1980)

Like Jones, Lane spent two seasons with the Cougars and was a huge piece to some very good teams. He led the WAC in rushing touchdowns during both his seasons and finished eighth in the nation in touchdowns from scrimmage in 1980. His most productive season came as a junior in 1979 when he had 94 carries for 595 yards and 12 touchdowns while recording 39 receptions for 477 yards and another score.

For his BYU career, he carried the ball 190 times for 1,062 yards and 22 touchdowns to go along with 82 catches for 904 yards and five scores.

15. Brian McKenzie (1996-97)

While McKenzie only spent two seasons on the field in Provo, both of them were memorable. He led the team in rushing and had at least 11 touchdowns each season. His most productive season came as a senior in 1997 when he 218 carries for 1,004 yards and 12 touchdowns. He added 15 receptions for 123 yards.

For his BYU career, he carried the ball 385 times for 1,954 yards and 23 touchdowns to go along with 23 catches for 212 yards.

14. Naufahu Tahi (1999, 2002-05)

While his overall numbers don’t compare to some of the players already on the list, the reason why he is this high is because he was also an incredibly gifted blocker. His best season came as a senior in 2005 when he had 97 carries for 497 yards and six touchdowns. He also manged 41 catches for 375 yards and another score.

For his BYU career, he carried the ball 326 times for 1,358 yards and 14 touchdowns to go along with 81 receptions for 730 yards and five scores.

13. Weldon Jackson (1956-58)

While his numbers aren’t massive, what Jackson did in the context of when he played was enough to prove that he was a great back at BYU. His best season came as a senior in 1958 when he finished third in the nation with 6.9 yards per carry and seventh in rushing yards. That year, he carried the ball 101 times for 698 yards and six touchdowns.

For his BYU career, he had 292 carries for 1,449 yards and nine touchdowns to go along with 14 receptions for 81 yards.

12. Jamaal Williams (2012-current)

While he has already done some really nice things during his time at BYU, Williams will vault up this list if he has a good senior year. His most productive season to this point came as a sophomore in 2013 when he carried the ball 217 times for 1,233 yards and seven touchdowns. He also totaled 18 receptions for 125 yards.

To this point in his BYU career, he has 492 carries for 2,526 yards and 23 touchdowns to go along with 53 catches for 487 yards and another score.

11. Casey Tiumalu (1982-83)

Tiumalu might not be the most recognizable name to BYU fans, but he was a great back during his two seasons. His most productive season came as a senior in 1983 when he finished eighth in the nation in yards some scrimmage with 1,434 and was named first-team all-WAC. That year, carried the ball 139 times for 851 yards and three touchdowns as well as catching 60 passes for 583 yards and three more scores.

For his BYU career, he had 249 carries for 1,516 yards and 11 touchdowns to go along with 80 receptions for 766 yards and five scores.

10. Ronney Jenkins (1996-98)

Even though Jenkins played just two seasons before he left, he is one of the best backs the Cougars have ever seen. His best season came as a junior when he led the WAC in rushing yards as well as yards from and touchdowns from scrimmage. That year, he carried the ball 252 times for 1,307 yards and 13 touchdowns while adding 34 receptions for 349 yards and two more scores.

For his BYU career, he had 380 carries for 2040 yards and 24 touchdowns to go along with 48 receptions for 538 yards and five scores.

9. Matt Bellini (1986-1990)

While he wasn’t used as a traditional running back, but Bellini made some huge contributions coming out of the backfield as a Cougar. He finish on the all-WAC first or second-team his last three years on campus and earned honorable mention All-American honors multiple seasons. His most productive season came as a sophomore in 1988 when he carried the ball 98 times for 488 yards and seven touchdowns as well as catching 51 passes for 786 yards and four more scores.

For his BYU career, he had 214 carries for 931 yards and 14 touchdowns to go along with a then BYU record 204 receptions for 2,635 yards and 15 scores.

8. John Ogden (1964-66)

Ogden did some amazing things during his three seasons on the field at BYU. He led the WAC in rushing yards for three consecutive seasons and earned first-team all-WAC during his junior and senior seasons. His most productive year came as a senior in 1966 when he carried the ball 204 times for 906 yards and four touchdowns.

For his BYU career, he had 535 carries for 2,376 yards and 11 touchdowns to go along with two receptions for 30 yards and a score.

7. Jeff Blanc (1973-76)

Blanc was the first great dual-threat back the Cougars had. He earned first-team all-WAC in his last two seasons and finished as the BYU career leader in rushing yards and touchdowns. His most productive season came as a sophomore in 1974 when he carried the ball 199 times for 784 yards and six touchdowns while catching 32 passes for 442 yards and four more scores.

For his BYU career, he had 625 carries for 2,718 yards and 21 touchdowns to go along with 74 receptions for 886 yards and eight scores.

6. Lakei Heimuli (1983-86)

Another one of the impressive dual-threat backs, Heimuli was first-team all-WAC in his last two seasons and left BYU as one of the leading rushers in school history. His most productive season came as a junior in 1985 when he finished sixth in the nation in rushing touchdowns and ninth in receptions. That year, he carried the ball 188 times for 857 yards and 14 touchdowns while catching 66 passes for 459 yards.

For his BYU career, he had 605 carries for 2,710 yards and 30 touchdowns to go along with 139 receptions for 1,123 yards and two scores.

5. Pete Van Valkenburg (1969-1972)

After two solid years, Van Valkenburg gave BYU one of the special seasons by a back in school history as a senior in 1972. That year, he led the nation in rushing with 1,386 yards to go along with 12 touchdowns even though he wasn’t even in the top 10 in carries. He also finished second in yards from scrimmage to earn first-team all-WAC and AP third-team All-American.

For his BYU career, he carried the ball 456 times for 2,392 yards and 24 touchdowns to go along with 25 catches for 280 yards and two scores.

4. Jamal Willis (1991-94)

Willis had two great years during his time as a Cougar. He was the first BYU back to cross the 1,000-yard plateau on two occasions and finished his career as the school’s all-time leader in rushing yards and touchdowns. His best season came as a senior in 1994 when he earned first-team all-WAC and finished top 10 in the nation in yards and touchdowns from scrimmage. That year, he carried the ball 204 times for 1042 yards and 12 touchdowns as well as catching 33 passes for 525 yards and two more scores.

For his BYU career, he had 594 carries for 2,970 yards and 35 touchdowns to go along with 77 catches for 1,095 yards and five scores.

3. Curtis Brown (2002-06)

Brown was a do everything back during his time in Provo. He was the first player to have back-to-back 1,000-yard seasons and earned first-team all-MWC twice. His most productive season came a s a junior in 2005 when he rushed for 1,123 yards and 14 touchdowns while catching 53 passes for 454 yards and two more scores.

He finished his BYU career, with 641 carries for 3,221 yards and 31 touchdowns to go along with 157 catches for 1,309 yards and five scores.

2. Harvey Unga (2006-2009)

When Unga was on the field, he was one of the most dominant backs BYU fans have ever seen. During his time as a Cougar, he won MWC freshman of the year, was second-team all-MWC as a sophomore and first-team all-MWC as a junior. His most productive statistical season came as a freshman in 2007 when he carried the ball 244 times for 1,227 yards and 13 touchdowns while catching 44 passes for 655 yards and four more scores.

For his BYU career, he carried the ball 696 times for a school record 3,455 yards and 36 touchdowns to go along with 102 catches for 1,085 yards and nine scores.

1. Luke Staley (1999-2001)

Staley did three things at BYU that set him apart from all other running backs. He won the MWC offensive player of the year award, was a consensus first-team All-American and won the Doak Walker Award as the nation’s most outstanding running back. All of those honors came as a junior in 2001 when he lead the nation in rushing touchdowns (24) and touchdowns from scrimmage (28). He also finished second nationally in rushing yards (1,596), yards per carry (8.1) and yards from scrimmage (1,930).

For his BYU career, he had 418 carries for 2,507 yards and 41 touchdowns to go along with 86 catches for 1,000 yards and seven scores. His 48 touchdowns are still a school record.