Even though dynamic backs like Melvin Gordon, Tevin Coleman, Todd Gurley, Jay Ajayi and Ameer Abdullah are off to the bright lights of the NFL, the returning crop of star running backs to the college game might be the best ever. In fact, of the 53 running backs to hit the 1,000-yard plateau in 2014, 35 are returning. On top of that, 12 players who rushed for at least 1,500 yards will back on the field in 2015.

Some of the players on this list aren’t household names (yet), but all of them will do damage on the gridiron in 2015.

Here is the list of the best running backs heading into the 2015 college football season.

Stats and statistical rankings from ESPN.com and NCAA.com.

H.M. Marcus Cox, sophomore, Appalachian State

Cox had a huge year in his first season with the Mountaineers as they finished 7-5. His best game came in a 44-0 win over Georgia State when he carried the ball 29 times for 250 yards and three touchdowns.

On the season, he had 255 carries for 1,415 yards and 19 scores. He added 16 receptions for 180 yards.

H.M. Aaron Jones, junior, UTEP

Jones had an impressive all-around season as a sophomore with the Miners. His best game came in a season-opening win against the New Mexico Lobos when he registered 237 yards and three touchdowns on 22 carries in a 31-24 win.

On the season, he had 242 carries for 1,321 yards and 11 touchdowns. He was also a threat in the passing game with 30 catches for 293 yards and three more scores.

H.M. Justin Jackson, sophomore, Northwestern

Jackson had a nice freshman campaign even though the Wildcats won just five games. His best game of the season came in a 20-14 upset win over Wisconsin when he finished with 33 carries for 162 yards.

For the season, he had 245 carries for 1,187 yards and 10 touchdowns to go along with 22 catches for 201 yards and another score.

H.M. Aaron Green, senior, TCU

Green had a slow start to the season, but once he got more touches he showed why he is such an explosive back. His best game last year came in a 41-20 win over Kansas State when he had 171 yards and a touchdown on just 18 carries.

On the season, he carried the ball 129 times for 922 yards and nine touchdowns to go along with 19 receptions for 166 yards and two more scores.

H.M. Marteze Waller, senior, Fresno State

Even though the Bulldogs struggles to a 6-8 record in 2014, Waller was a beast. His best game came in a 37-27 loss to Boise State when he had 164 yards and two touchdowns on 18 carries.

For the season, he had 225 carries for 1,368 yards and 11 touchdowns to go along with 27 receptions for 120 yards.

25. Alex Collins, junior, Arkansas

While Collins has to split touches, he is part of one of the best backfields in the country. His best game came in a 49-28 win over Texas Tech when he had 212 yards and two touchdowns on a season-high 27 carries.

On the season, he carried the ball 204 times for 1,100 yards and 12 touchdowns.

24. Dee Hart, senior, Colorado State

Even though the Rams are more of a passing team, Hart had an incredible year on the ground. His best game came in a 58-20 win over New Mexico when he totaled 230 yards and five touchdowns on 20 carries.

On the season, he had 194 carries for 1,275 yards and 16 touchdowns to go along with 18 catches for 189 yards and two more scores.

23. Jonathan Williams, senior, Arkansas

The second part of the two-headed rushing attack for the Razorbacks had a solid junior season. His best game came in a 49-28 win over Texas Tech when he ran for 145 yards and four touchdowns on 22 carries.

For the season, he managed 1,190 yards and 12 touchdowns on 211 carries to go along with 11 receptions for 65 yards and two more scores.

22. Jhurell Pressley, senior, New Mexico

While the Lobos had another down season, Pressley in the real deal. His best game came in 60-49 loss to Boise State when he carried the ball just seven times for 154 yards and two touchdowns.

On the season, he totaled 1,083 yards and 12 touchdowns on 114 carries. His 9.5 yards per carry would’ve led the nation if he had enough touches.

21. Elijah McGuire, junior, Louisiana Lafayette

McGuire was a huge reason why the Ragin’ Cajuns had such a successful season in 2014. His best showing came in a 55-40 win over Arkansas State when he registered 19 carries for 265 yards and four touchdowns.

For the season, he carried the ball 166 times for 1,264 yards and 14 touchdowns to go along with 45 receptions for 468 yards and two more scores. His 7.61 yards per carry was good for third in the nation, according to NCAA.com.

20. Shock Linwood, junior, Baylor

The aerial attack for Baylor was very impressive in 2014, but so was the rushing attack thanks to exploits of Linwood. His best game came in a 61-58 win over TCU when he carried the ball 29 times for 178 yards.

On the season, he finished with 1,252 yards and 16 touchdowns on 251 carries.

19. Leon Allen, senior, Western Kentucky

After two seasons with minimal touches, Allen had a monster season in 2014. His best game came in a 52-24 win over Army when he had 33 carries for 345 yards and three touchdowns.

On the season, he carried the ball 272 times for 1,542 yards and 13 touchdowns to go along with 51 receptions for 476 yards and three more scores.

18. Jarvion Franklin, sophomore, Western Michigan

Although his season didn’t end the way it started, Franklin had a dominating freshman year. He had six games of at least 150 yards rushing and three touchdowns. His best performance came in 45-33 win over Idaho when he carried the ball 33 times for 211 yards and three scores.

On the season, he had 306 carries for 1,551 yards and 24 touchdowns to go along with 15 catches for 168 yards and another score.

17. Jordan Howard, junior, Indiana

Tevin Coleman is gone, but the Hoosiers have another star running back in the wings thanks to UAB shutting down its football program. Howard closed out the season in fine fashion for the Blazers with four straight games of at least 145 yards. His best showing came in a 45-24 win over Southern Mississippi when he had 262 yards and a touchdown on 35 carries.

For the season, he registered 306 carries for 1,587 yards and 13 touchdowns to go along with nine receptions for 72 yards and another score.

16. Nick Wilson, sophomore, Arizona

Wilson is one of the many talented young Pac-12 backs who had a very solid freshman season. His best game came in a 42-10 win over the Utah Utes when he carried the ball 20 times for 218 yards and three touchdowns.

For the season, he had 236 carries for 1,375 yards and 16 touchdowns to go along with 12 receptions for 90 yards and another score.

15. Matt Breida. junior, Georgia Southern

After he got very little time in the backfield as a freshman, he had a breakout sophomore season. His best game came in a 69-31 win over Georgia State when he had 12 carries for 201 yards and four touchdowns.

For the season, he carried the ball 171 times for 1,485 yards and 17 touchdowns to go along with eight receptions for 97 yards and another score. Those numbers were good enough to earn a spot as one of the 10 finalists for the Doak Walker Award given to the Nation’s top running back.

14. Donnel Pumphrey, junior, San Diego State

Pumphrey carried the load for the Aztecs’ offense with a massive sophomore season. He finished fourth in the nation in rushing yards and ninth in rushing touchdowns. His best game came in a 38-7 win over San Jose State when he carried the ball 21 times for 261 yards and three touchdowns.

For the season, he registered 276 carries for 1,867 yards and 20 touchdowns. He added 23 catches for 160 yards.

13. Royce Freeman, sophomore, Oregon

Although he wasn’t at his best during the final four games, Freeman had a standout freshman season. His best game came in a 45-20 win over Washington when he totaled 169 yards and four touchdowns on 29 carries.

For the year, he registered 252 carries for 1,365 yards and 18 touchdowns to go along with 16 catches for 158 yards an another score.

12. Kareem Hunt, junior, Toledo

Even though he only played in 10 games as a sophomore, Hunt put up some of the best numbers in all of college football in 2014. He finished third nationally in rushing yards per game and second in yards per carry. His best performance came in the 63-44 win over Arkansas State when he managed 32 carries for 271 yards and five touchdowns.

On the season, he finished with 1,631 yards and 16 touchdowns on 205 carries.

11. Paul Perkins, senior, UCLA

Perkins was one of the best running backs in a loaded Pac-12 conference. His best game came in the 40-35 Alamo Bowl win over Kansas State when he had 20 carries for 194 yards and two touchdowns.

On the season, he carried the ball 251 times for 1,575 yards and nine touchdowns to go along with 26 receptions for 201 yards and two more scores.

10. Devon Johnson, senior, Marshall

Even though he struggled with some injuries, Johnson had a big junior year for the Thundering Herd. He finished sixth in the nation in rushing yards and first in yards per carry. His best showing came in a 35-16 win over Florida Atlantic when he carried the ball 24 times for 272 yards and four touchdowns.

On the season, he had 206 carries for 1,767 yards and 17 touchdowns to go along with six catches for 121 yards and two scores.

9. Devontae Booker, senior, Utah

Booker was the perfect fit for a Utah offense that was looking for an identity. After splitting touched for the first three games of the year, he got to carry the load and great things happened. His best showing came in a 29-23 double-overtime win over Oregon State when he totaled 32 carries for 229 yards and three touchdowns.

On the season, he carried the ball 292 times for 1,512 yards and 10 touchdowns to go along with 43 receptions for 306 yards and two more scores.

8. Dalvin Cook, sophomore, Florida State

Even though there were six games in 2014 where he had less than 10 carries, Cook showed that he could be a force for the Seminoles. His best performance came in the ACC championship game when he totaled 31 carries for 177 yards and a touchdown.

On the season, he carried the ball 170 times for 1,008 yards and eight touchdowns to go along with 22 catches for 203 yards.

7. Derrick Henry, junior, Alabama

Henry doesn’t have to contend with T.J. Yeldon for touches in the backfield anymore and that will do wonders for his already impressive totals. His best performance in 2014 came in the 42-13 SEC championship game win over Missouri when he had 20 carries for 141 yards and two touchdowns.

For the season, he carried the ball 172 times for 990 yards and 11 touchdowns to go along with five receptions for 133 yards and two more scores.

6. Corey Clement, junior, Wisconsin

It didn’t take a ton of touches to realize that Clement has the skill-set to be a star for the Badgers. His best game came in a 38-28 win over Illinois when he had 13 carries for 164 yards and a touchdown.

For the season, he had 147 carries for 949 yards and nine touchdowns to go along with 14 catches for 119 yards and two more scores. Not bad for a guy who was playing behind Melvin Gordon.

5. Leonard Fournette, sophomore, LSU 

While his freshman campaign was solid, Fournette showed glimpses of what kind of star-power he possesses during the last two games of the year. His most impressive showing came in the 31-28 loss to Notre Dame in the Music City Bowl when he had 11 carries for 143 yards and two touchdowns.

On the season, he finished with 1.034 yards and 10 touchdowns on 187 carries to go along with seven receptions for 127 yards.

4. James Conner, junior, Pittsburgh

Conner is a big, bruising back who put up huge performances all season long. He finished seventh in the nation in rushing yards and third in rushing touchdowns. His best showing came in a 51-48 double-overtime loss to Duke when he had 38 carries for 263 yards and three touchdowns.

For the season, he carried the ball 298 times for 1,765 yards and 26 touchdowns.

3. Samaje Perine, sophomore, Oklahoma

Perine wasn’t very consistent as a freshman, but when he had it going, he was hard to tackle. He finished eighth in the nation in both rushing yards and rushing touchdowns. His best game came in a 44-7 win over Kansas when he broke the FCS single-game rushing record with 427 yards and five touchdowns on 34 carries.

For the season, he carried the ball 263 times for 1,713 yards and 21 touchdowns.

2. Nick Chubb, sophomore, Georgia

Few expected the kind of success that Chubb had in the Georgia backfield in 2014. After he saw limited action to start the season playing behind Todd Gurley, Chubb got his chance and took full advantage. His most impressive showing of the season came in the 37-14 over Louisville in the Belk Bowl when he had 266 yards and two touchdowns on 33 carries.

On the season, he totaled 219 carries for 1,547 yards and 14 touchdowns to go along with 18 catches for 213 yards and two more scores.

1. Ezekiel Elliott, junior, Ohio State

While all the hype surrounded the Ohio State quarterbacks during the 2014 campaign, Elliott quietly stepped up and had a terrific season. He finished third in the nation in rushing yards and eighth in yards per carry. His best game of the year came in the 42-20 win over Oregon in the National Championship when he rushed for 246 yards and four touchdowns.

For the season, he finished with 273 carries for 1,878 yards and 18 touchdowns to go along with 28 receptions for 220 yards.

The 1990 NBA draft wasn’t loaded with superstars, but there were plenty of talented players who had solid careers, including six all-stars and a hall of famer. The ’90 draft consisted of 54 selections over the course of two rounds, including 52 players who played in the NBA, according to basketball-reference.com.

The player draft the lowest who played in the league was Sean Higgins. He was taken with the last pick in the draft by the San Antonio Spurs, but manged to play six seasons.

Here is a look at how the 1990 NBA draft would have gone if it were done today.

27. Jud Buechler

Buechler was originally selected with the 11th pick in the second round (38th overall) by the Seattle SuperSonics and then traded to the New Jersey Nets. While he never saw a lot of floor time, he lasted 12 seasons with the Nets, San Antonio Spurs, Golden State Warriors, Chicago Bulls, Detroit Pistons, Phoenix Suns and the Orlando Magic. His most productive season came with the Warriors in 1992-93 when he averaged 6.2 points, 2.8 rebounds and 1.3 assists in 70 games.

For his career, he averaged 3.3 points and 1.8 rebounds in 720 games. He won three championships as a member of the Bulls.

26. Greg Foster

Foster was originally taken with the eighth pick in the second round (35th overall) by the Washington Bullets. He played 13 seasons for the Bullets, Atlanta Hawks, Milwaukee Bucks, Chicago Bulls, Minnesota Timberwolves, Utah Jazz, Seattle SuperSonics, Los Angeles Lakers and the Toronto Raptors. His Best season came with the Jazz in 1997-98 when he averaged 5.7 points and 3.5 rebounds in 78 games.

For his career, he averaged 3.9 points and 2.6 rebounds in 656 games. He won a championship with the Lakers in 2000-01.

25. Travis Mays

Mays was taken with the 14th overall pick by the Sacramento Kings. He spent three seasons in the league with the Kings and Atlanta Hawks before he finished his playing career overseas. His best season came as a rookie in 1990-91 when he averaged 14.3 points, 4.0 assists, 2.8 rebounds and 1.3 steals in 64 games.

For his career, he averaged 11.1 points, 2.8 assists and 2.0 rebounds in 115 games.

24. Carl Herrera

Herrera was selected with the third pick of the second round (30th overall) by the Miami Heat but was traded to the Houston Rockets on draft night. He played eight seasons for the Rockets, San Antonio Spurs, Vancouver Grizzlies and the Denver Nuggets. His best season came with Houston in 1992-92 when he averaged 7.5 points on 54.1 percent shooting from the floor with 5.6 rebounds in 81 games.

For his career, he averaged 5.3 points and 3.6 rebounds in 465 games. He won two rings during his time with the Rockets.

23. Duane Causwell

Causwell was taken with the 18th overall pick by the Sacramento Kings. He played 11 seasons for the Kings and the Miami Heat. His most productive season came with Sacramento in 1991-92 when he averaged 8.0 points on 54.9 percent shooting to go along with 7.3 rebounds and 2.7 blocks in 80 games.

For his career, he averaged 4.9 points, 4.2 rebounds and 1.4 blocks in 541 games.

22. Anthony Bonner

Bonner was selected with the 23rd overall pick by the Sacramento Kings. He played six seasons for the Kings, New York Knicks and the Orlando Magic. His best season came with the Kings in 1991-92 when he averaged 9.4 points, 6.1 rebounds, 1.6 assists and 1.2 steals in 79 games.

For his career, he averaged 6.9 points, 5.4 rebounds, 1.4 assists and 1.1 steals in 318 games.

21. Rumeal Robinson

Robinson was selected with the 10th overall pick by the Atlanta Hawks. He played six seasons with the Hawks, New Jersey Nets, Charlotte Hornets, Portland Trail Blazers, Los Angeles Lakers and the Phoenix Suns. His best season came with the Hawks in 1991-92 when he averaged 13 points, 5.5 assists, 2.7 rebounds and 1.3 steals in 81 games.

For his career, he averaged 7.6 points, 3.5 assists and 1.8 rebounds in 336 games.

20. Felton Spencer

Spencer was taken with the sixth overall pick by the Minnesota Timberwolves. He played 12 seasons for the Timberwolves, Utah Jazz, Orlando Magic, Golden State Warriors, San Antonio Spurs and the New York Knicks. His best season came with the Jazz in 1993-94 when he averaged 8.6 points on 50.5 percent shooting with 8.3 rebounds in 79 games.

For his career, he averaged 5.2 points and 5.4 rebounds in 640 games.

19. Tony Massenburg

Massenburg was selected with the 16th pick In the second round (43rd overall) by the San Antonio Spurs. He played 13 seasons with the Spurs, Charlotte Hornets, Boston Celtics, Golden State Warriors, Los Angeles Clippers, Toronto Raptors, Philadelphia 76ers, New Jersey Nets, Vancouver/Memphis Grizzlies, Houston Rockets, Utah Jazz and the Sacramento Kings. His best season came in Vancouver in 1998-99 when he averaged 11.2 points and 6.0 rebounds in 43 games.

For his career, he averaged 6.2 points and 4.3 rebounds in 683 games.

18. Derek Strong

Strong was taken with the 20th pick in the second round (47th overall) by the Philadelphia 76ers. He played 10 seasons for the Washington Bullets, Milwaukee Bucks, Boston Celtics, Los Angeles Lakers, Orlando Magic and the Los Angeles Clippers. His best season came with the Magic in 1997-98 when he averaged 12.7 points and 7.4 rebounds in 58 games.

For his career, he averaged 6.8 points and 4.9 rebounds in 456 games.

17. Willie Burton

Burton was selected with the ninth overall pick by the Miami Heat. He played eight seasons for the Heat, Philadelphia 76ers, Atlanta Hawks, San Antonio Spurs and the Charlotte Hornets. His best season came with the 76ers in 1994-95 when he averaged 15.3 points, 3.1 rebounds and 1.8 assists in 53 games.

For his career, he averaged 10.3 points, 2.9 rebounds and 1.2 assists in 316 games.

16. Bimbo Coles

Coles was taken with the 13th pick in the second round (40th overall) by the Sacramento Kings and then traded to the Miami Heat. He played 14 seasons for the Heat, Golden State Warriors, Atlanta Hawks, Cleveland Cavaliers and the Boston Celtics. His best season came with the Heat in 1994-95 when he averaged 10 points, 6.1 assists, 2.8 rebounds and 1.5 steals in 68 games.

For his career, he averaged 7.8 points, 3.9 assists and 2.1 rebounds in 852 games.

15. Dee Brown

Brown was taken by the Boston Celtics with the 19th overall pick. He played 12 seasons with the Celtics, Toronto Raptors  and the Orlando Magic. His most productive season came with the Celtics in 1993-94 when he averaged 15.5 points on 48 percent shooting from the floor. He added 4.5 assists, 3.9 rebounds and 2.0 steals in 77 games.

For his career, he averaged 11.1 points, 3.7 assists, 2.6 rebounds and 1.3 steals in 608 games.

14. Terry Mills

Mills was selected with the 16th overall pick by the Milwaukee Bucks, but was traded to the Denver Nuggets before playing a game. He played 11 season for the Nuggets, New Jersey Nets, Detroit Pistons, Miami Heat and the Indiana Pacers. His best season came with the Pistons in 1993-94 when he averaged 17.3 points on 51.1 percent shooting from the floor. He added 8.4 rebounds and 2.2 assists in 80 games.

For his career, he averaged 10.6 points, 5.4 rebounds and 1.3 assists in 678 games.

13. Dennis Scott

Scott was taken by the Orlando Magic with the fourth overall pick. He played for 10 seasons with the Magic, Dallas Mavericks, Phoenix Suns, New York Knicks, Minnesota Timberwolves and the Vancouver Grizzlies. His best season came with Orlando in 1995-96 when he averaged 17.5 points, 3.8 rebounds, 3.0 assists and 1.1 steals in 82 games.

For his career, he averaged 12.9 points, 2.8 rebounds and 2.1 assists in 629 games.

12. Jayson Williams

Williams was selected with the 21st overall pick by the Phoenix Suns, but was traded to the Philadelphia 76ers before he ever played a regular season game. He played nine seasons with the 76ers and the New Jersey Nets. His best season came with New Jersey in 1997-98 when he made the all-star game after he averaged 12.9 points while finishing second in the league with 13.6 rebounds in 65 games.

For his career, he averaged 7.3 points and 7.5 rebounds in 475 games.

11. Lionel Simmons

Simmons was taken with the seventh overall pick by the Sacramento Kings. He spent his entire seven-year career and was a solid all-around player. His most productive season game in 1991-92 when he averaged 17.1 points, 8.1 rebounds, 4.3 assists, 1.7 steals and 1.7 blocks in 78 games.

For his career, he averaged 12.8 points, 6.2 rebounds, 3.3 assists and 1.1 steals in 454 games.

10. Mahmoud Abdul-Rauf

Abdul-Rauf was selected with the third overall pick by the Denver Nuggets. He played nine seasons for the Nuggets, Sacramento Kings and the Vancouver Grizzlies. His best season came in Denver in 1995-96 when he averaged 19.2 points, 6.8 assists, 2.4 rebounds and 1.1 steals while leading the league in free-throw shooting.

For his career, he averaged 14.6 points, 3.5 assists and 1.9 rebounds in 586 games.

9. Loy Vaught

Vaught was taken with the 13th overall pick by the Los Angeles Clippers. He spent 11 seasons in the NBA with the Clippers, Detroit Pistons, Dallas Mavericks and the Washington Wizards. One of his best seasons came with Los Angeles in 1995-96 when he averaged 16.2 points on 52.5 percent shooting. He added 10.1 rebounds,1.4 assists and 1.1 steals in 80 games.

For his career, he averaged 10.1 points on 50.4 percent shooting with 7.1 rebounds in 689 games.

8. Elden Campbell

He was selected with the 27th overall pick by the Los Angeles Lakers. He played 15 seasons in the NBA with the Lakers, Charlotte/New Orleans Hornets, Seattle SuperSonics, Detroit Pistons and the New Jersey Nets. His best season came with Los Angeles in 1995-96 when he averaged 13.9 points on 50.3 percent shooting from the floor. He added 7.6 rebounds, 2.6 blocks, 2.2 assists and 1.1 steals in 82 games.

For his career, he averaged 10.3 points, 5.9 rebounds, 1.5 blocks and 1.1 assists in 1,044 games.

7. Tyrone Hill

Hill was taken with the 11th overall pick by the Golden State Warriors. He played 14 seasons for the Warriors, Cleveland Cavaliers, Milwaukee Bucks, Philadelphia 76ers and the Miami Heat. His best season came in Cleveland in 1994-95 when he averaged 13.8 points on 50.4 percent shooting from the floor. He added 10.9 rebounds in 70 games to make his only all-star games appearance.

For his career, he averaged 9.4 points on 50.2 percent shooting with 8.6 rebounds in 801 games.

6. Antonio Davis

Davis was taken with the 18th pick in the second round (45th overall) by the Indiana Pacers. He played 13 seasons for the Pacers, Toronto Raptors, Chicago Bulls and New York Knicks. ONe of his best seasons came with the Raptors in 2000-01 when he averaged 13.7 points, 10.1 rebounds, 1.9 blocks and 1.4 assists to make his only all-star game.

For his career, he averaged 10 points, 7.5 rebounds, 1.1 assists and 1.0 blocks in 903 games.

5. Kendall Gill

Gill was selected with the fifth overall pick by the Charlotte Hornets. He played 15 seasons for the Hornets, Seattle SuperSonics, New Jersey Nets, Miami Heat, Minnesota Timberwolves, Chicago Bulls and the Milwaukee Bucks. His best season came with the Nets in 1996-97 when he averaged 21.8 points, 6.1 rebounds, 4.0 assists and 1.9 steals in 82 games.

For his career, he averaged 13.4 points, 4.1 rebounds, 3.0 assists and 1.6 steals in 966 games.

4. Cedric Ceballos

Ceballos was taken with the 21st pick in the second round (48th overall) by the Phoenix Suns. He played 11 seasons for the Suns, Los Angeles Lakers, Dallas Mavericks, Detroit Pistons and the Miami Heat. One of his most productive seasons came with the Lakers in 1994-95 when he averaged 21.7 points on 50.9 percent shooting from the floor. He added 8.0 rebounds, 1.8 assists and 1.0 steals in 58 games to earn a spot on the all-star game roster.

For his career, he averaged 14.3 points on 50 percent shooting with 5.3 rebounds and 1.2 assists in 609 games.

3. Toni Kukoc

Kukoc was selected with the second pick in the second round (29th overall) by the Chicago Bulls. He played 13 seasons for the Bulls, Philadelphia 76ers, Atlanta Hawks and the Milwaukee Bucks. One of his best statistical seasons came with Chicago in 1998-99 when he averaged 18.8 points, 7.0 rebounds, 5.3 assists and 1.1 steals in 44 games.

For his career, he averaged 11.6 points, 4.2 rebounds, 3.7 assists and 1.0 steals in 846 games. He won three championships during his time with the Bulls.

2. Derrick Coleman

Coleman was taken with the first overall pick by the New Jersey Nets. He played 15 seasons for the Nets, Charlotte Hornets, Philadelphia 76ers, and Detroit Pistons. One of his best seasons came in New Jersey in 1993-94 when he averaged 20.2 points, 11.3 rebounds, 3.4 assists and 1.8 blocks to make his only all-star game.

For his career, he averaged 16.5 points, 9.3 rebounds, 2.5 assists and 1.3 blocks in 781 games.

1. Gary Payton

Payton was selected with the second overall pick by the Seattle SuperSonics. He played 17 seasons for the Sonics, Milwaukee Bucks, Los Angeles Lakers, Boston Celtics and the Miami Heat and was a nine-time all-star. His best season came in Seattle in 1999-2000 when he averaged 24.2 points, 8.9 assists, 6.5 rebounds and 1.9 steals in 82 games. He was a lockdown defender who earned first-team all-defense nine years in a row while being named all-NBA  first, second or third team each of those years.

For his career, he averaged 16.3 points, 6.7 assists, 3.9 rebounds and 1.8 steals in 1,335 games. He was inducted in the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame in 2013.

Now that the Houston Rockets have comeback from a three games-to-one deficit to eliminate the Los Angeles Clippers, the NBA has its final four.
The Rockets will square off against the Golden State Warriors in the Western Conference while the Cleveland Cavaliers will battle the Atlanta Hawks in the east for the right to play for the NBA championship.
One of the major keys to who will advance to the Finals is how the stars perform – and we definitely have some stars still remaining. Some stars will step up in the big spots and carry their teams to victory while others will be over-matched and get sent home without reaching the goal.
With that in mind, here is the ranking of the most important players left in the NBA playoffs.
15. Tristan Thompson, Cleveland Cavaliers
Thompson is a huge piece for the success of the Cavaliers because of his ability to rebound the basketball. He has owned the offensive glass during the first two rounds for Cleveland and provided plenty of extra opportunities to score. His finishing ability around the rim can’t be overlooked either in a matchup against an undersized team.
So far in the playoffs, he is averaging 8.5 points on 56.6 percent shooting with 9.4 rebounds and 1.1 blocks in 32.4 minutes a game.
14. Andrew Bogut, Golden State Warriors
Bogut is the defensive backbone of a terrific Golden State defense. He did an excellent job of providing weak side help to keep both Marc Gasol and Zach Randolph at bay to help the Warriors advance to the next round.  He will need to rebound, block shots and keep Dwight Howard in check for the Warriors to make a push to the NBA finals.
So far in the playoffs, he is averaging 5.3 points on 59.1 percent shooting with 8.3 rebounds, 2.0 assists and 2.0 blocks in 25.9 minutes a contest.
13. Kyle Korver, Atlanta Hawks
The Hawks have struggled a bit during the first two rounds and Korver was a big reason why. When he is locked in with his outside shot, he can space the floor better than anyone on the league. That creates lanes for Jeff Teague and Dennis Schroder to attack the rim and get easy buckets. When Korver isn’t hitting, those lanes are much smaller and the Hawks aren’t as effective offensively. If Atlanta has any chance to knock off the Cavaliers, then he really needs to knock down shots.
So far in the playoffs, he is averaging 11.3 points on 38.5 percent shooting from the floor, including just 35 percent from 3-point range in 38.1 minutes a game.
12. Josh Smith, Houston Rockets
Smith might be the biggest wildcard in all of the playoffs. He helped to keep the Rockets alive against the Clippers after Kevin McHale inserted him into the starting lineup. He has been good on the glass, done a solid job on defense and knocked down more than a handful of huge 3-point shots. If the Rockets want to make it to the finals, Smith will need to be even better against the Warriors.
So far in the playoffs, he is averaging 12.9 points on 46.4 percent shooting with 5.8 rebounds and 2.4 assists in 22.6 minutes a night.
11. Paul Millsap, Atlanta Hawks
While Millsap will need to produce on the offensive end of the floor, his biggest role just may be on the defensive glass if the Hawks are to advance past the much larger Cleveland Cavaliers. Thankfully for Atlanta, Millsap has being doing work on the backboards for a long time and knows how to get it done. He will also be called upon to spell DeMarre Carroll in trying to slow down LeBron James. If he can do those things, the Hawks will have a shot at a ring.
So far in the playoffs, he is averaging 15.7 points, 9.0 rebounds, 3.8 assists, 1.8 steals and 1.1 blocks in 35.4 minutes a game.
10. Draymond Green, Golden State Warriors
Green has been a massive reason for the steps the Warriors have taken this season. New coach Steve Kerr trusted him with more minutes, and Green contributed on both ends of the floor. He helps to space the floor by knocking down the open three and is one of the best defenders in the game. He will need to help out on the glass, knock down open shots and take his turn slowing down James Harden if the Warriors want to move on.
So far in the playoffs, he is averaging 13.8 points, 10.1 rebounds, 5.1 assists and 2.1 steals in 37.1 minutes a contest.
9. Al Horford, Atlanta Hawks
Horford has a tall task at hand if Atlanta wants to make its way to the finals. He must keep Tristan Thompson and Timofey Mozgov off the offensive glass and also be the rim protector for when LeBron James and Kyrie Irving get into the lane. Neither assignment will be an easy one, But Horford has had plenty of chances to get ready by shutting down Marcin Gortat and Nene in the last round.
So far in the playoffs, he is averaging 15.6 points, 9.9 rebounds, 4.1 assists and 1.8 blocks in 33.8 minutes a night.
8. Kyrie Irving, Cleveland Cavaliers
Irving would be higher on this list if not for some nagging injuries that have slowed him down. Even though he has struggled with his health, Irving will need to make huge contributions if the Cavaliers are to move on. He will need to knock down shots to give LeBron James some help on the offensive end while trying to stay in front of two of the league’s quickest guards in Teague and Schroder.
So far in the playoffs, he is averaging 19.8 points, 3.3 rebounds, 3.3 assists and 1.2 steals in 37.1 minutes a game.
7. Dwight Howard, Houston Rockets
For the Rockets to advance, Howard will need to be huge on both ends of the floor. He will need to attack Bogut and the other Warriors bigs so that they can’t help off and will need to finish at a high percentage around the rim. On the other end of the floor, he will need to close down cutting lanes and limit the Warriors’ second chance opportunities.
So far in the playoffs, he is averaging 17.2 points, 13.8 rebounds, 2.5 blocks, 1.3 assists and 1.3 steals in 33.3 minutes a contest.
6. Jeff Teague, Atlanta Hawks
Teague will be the most important piece for the Hawks on the offensive end of the floor against the Cavaliers. He has a an edge in the speed department against whoever David Blatt (or LeBron James) throws at him. Teague needs to take advantage of the mismatch to get to the paint and create scoring opportunities for his teammates. If he can do that consistently, Atlanta will have a really good shot at making it to the finals.
So far in the playoffs, he is averaging 15.3 points, 7.4 assists, 3.2 rebounds and 1.6 steals in 32.3 minutes a night.
5. Klay Thompson, Golden State Warriors
Even though he is playing next to the league MVP, Thompson’s value to the success of the Warriors can’t be understated. He is one of the best catch-and-shoot players in the league today, but can also beat his defender off the bounce if need be. The most underrated part of his game will be huge in this series as he will be the primary defender on James Harden. If he can force Harden to shoot jump shots and stay out of foul trouble, the Warriors will punch their ticket to the NBA finals.
So far in the playoffs, he is averaging 20.7 points on 47.7 percent shooting from distance with 4.2 rebounds and 2.8 assists in 37.5 minutes a game.
4. DeMarre Carroll, Atlanta Hawks
The lone Hawks’ starter to not make the all-star game is the most important piece to their success against the Cleveland Cavaliers. Carroll will have the toughest assignment of anyone in trying to guard LeBron James. If that isn’t difficult enough, Carroll will also need to make his presence felt on the offensive end where he has been the Hawks’ most consistent player to this point in the playoffs.
So far in the playoffs, he is averaging 17.1 points on 52.4 percent shooting with 6.8 rebounds, 2.2 assists and 1.1 steals in 35.2 minutes a night.
3. James Harden, Houston Rockets
The runner-up in the MVP voting will have his hands full if he wants to help unseat the Warriors and make his way to the finals. Harden is the most creative scorers in the game who can get to the free-throw line at will and capitalize. Against the Warriors, he will have to show off his scoring prowess against some of the elite wing defenders in the game today in Thompson, Green and Andre Iguodala. On top of that, he will need to step up on the defensive end for the Rockets to have any shot.
So far in the playoffs, he is averaging 26.7 points, 8.0 assists, 4.8 rebounds and 1.3 steals in 36.4 minutes a contest.
2. Stephen Curry, Golden State Warriors
While he has plenty of talent around him, Curry has to be the catalyst if the Warriors are to advance to the NBA finals. The league MVP will need to space the floor with his remarkable shooting touch, attack the rim when he is run off the 3-point line and create great looks for his teammates. He will also need to create a pace that the undermanned Rockets can’t possibly hang with. On the defensive end, he will need to keep Jason Terry from getting wide-open looks from the outside.
So far in the playoffs, he is averaging 28.2 points, 6.8 assists, 5.1 rebounds and 1.8 steals in 38.7 minutes a game.
1. LeBron James, Cleveland Cavaliers
With the new “Big -Three” shrunk to one-and-a half because of injuries, James will have to shoulder more of the load than he did with the Miami Heat if he is to make his fifth straight appearance in the NBA finals. He will need to handle most of the ball handling responsibilities, take and make big shots and guard whoever is doing the most damage for the Hawks. While it will be a daunting task, he has shown that he is more than up to the challenge.
So far in the playoffs, he is averaging 26.5 points, 10.2 rebounds, 7.9 assists, 1.9 steals and 1.6 blocks in 41.7 minutes a night.